exposure-prone

exposure-prone

adjective Referring to a risk of contact with an adverse effect–eg malpractice liability, hazardous substance–eg, cyanide in environment, or pathogen–eg, HIV or HBV in a body fluid
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Caption: The publication profiles typical protection measures for crystalline silica exposure-prone work environments.
Transmission of BBVs is associated with exposure-prone invasive procedures (EPPs) (Table 1), inadequate infection control precautions and drug diversion by HCPs who abuse injection drugs, and determined by the circulating viral burden.
According to Australia's national guidelines, a health professional positive with HIV can continue to work as long as he or she does not perform exposure-prone procedures.
In August 2013, the Chief Medical Officer for England announced a change in policy to remove restrictions on Healthcare Workers (HCW) with HIV practising Exposure-Prone Procedures (EPPs).
The Fitness for Practice panel learned that he had ignored Government guidelines issued in 2002 banning health workers with hepatitis C from carrying out exposure-prone procedures where blood from the worker could get into the patients' tissues.
Recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone invasive procedures.
Exposure-prone procedures are those invasive procedures where there is a risk that injury to the worker may result in the exposure of the patient's open tissues to the blood of their health care worker.
30) Unfortunately, the CDC did not define the specific subset of invasive procedures that were exposure-prone.
A spokeswoman said: "This person never worked in the operating theatre of the hospital and was only present at a small number of exposure-prone procedures, all of which are in the low-risk category.
The appendices reprint crucial materials pertaining to HIV: the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for preventing HIV transmission in health care settings, their recommendations on HIV-infected health care workers performing exposure-prone medical and surgical procedures, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's workplace safety rule on blood-borne pathogens.
In addition, delegates said that physicians who are at significant risk of HIV infection and who perform exposure-prone procedures should know their HIV status and monitor that status at regular intervals, and those who are cognitively impaired by HIV infection, as with other illnesses, should not engage in any activity which could cause hazard to their patients.
Forty-three per cent (N=112) believed that HIV-positive surgeons should refrain from undertaking exposure-prone procedures, 47% (N=122) believed that they should not refrain, and 10% (N=25) were unsure.