decay constant

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de·cay con·stant

the fractional change in the number of atoms of a radionuclide that occurs in unit time; the constant λ in the equation for the fraction (dN/N) of the number of atoms (N) of a radionuclide disintegrating in time dt, dN/N = -λdt.

de·cay con·stant

(dĕ-kā' kon'stănt)
The fractional change in the number of atoms of a radionuclide that occurs in a unit of time; the constant l in the equation for the fraction (DN/N) of the number of atoms (N) of a radionuclide disintegrating in time Dt, DN/N = - lDt.
Synonym(s): radioactive constant.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the energy-dissipative volume expansion is uniformly distributed over the entire specimen, the energy dissipation takes place rather uniformly causing the exponential decay of the transverse wave as observed in Fig.
Using the same analytic methods described previously for comparing k values of satisficers and maximizers using the one-phase exponential decay model (i.
If the stochastic process of exponential decay is further considered, its p.
The concentration then decays from this value according to the exponential decay rule (4), but with a slight twist.
Figure 4 shows the concentration profile for data collected during the decay period on an 8000 gross cubic foot blast freezer (circles) along with a theoretical exponential decay curve (line).
Methods based on rational approximations get their power from the fast exponential decay of the error introduced by the approximant.
Potential demand is higher relative to the negative exponential decay function for the negative logistic function using nearest stop criterion and lower based on the notion of integral accessibility.
and because of exponential decay of the Gaussian function exp[-[[xi].
Another teacher-participant reported considering exponential decay in the 6th grade classroom by cutting a sheet of paper in half repeatedly.
2001), the data from both Darnum and the MRF suggest that the effect on TP of the time between fertiliser application and runoff, and the time between grazing and runoff, are similar to hyperbolic (inverse power) or exponential decay functions.
The rate of elimination fit best to a two-phase exponential decay with a biologic half-life of 12 and 266 hr.
Running time forward into the future, average plate size may grow further while the overall vigour of mantle convection will decrease as a result of secular heat loss and exponential decay of heat-producing elements.