explore

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explore

(ĭk-splôr′)
v. ex·plored, ex·ploring, ex·plores
v.tr.
1. To investigate systematically; examine: explore every possibility.
2. Medicine To examine (a body cavity or interior part) for diagnostic purposes, especially by surgery.
v.intr.
To make a careful examination or search: scientists who have been known to explore in this region of the earth.

explore

(eks-plōr)
In dentistry, the use of an instrument and tactile skill to examine the surface texture of a tooth.
[L. ex-ploro, to investigate, fr. ex-, out, + ploro, to deplore, weep over]

explore,

v to investigate.
References in classic literature ?
Mazarin had left his lamp in the gallery to make people believe that he was walking about, but he had with him a waxlight, to help him to explore his mysterious strong box.
Dropping to the floor once more, I detailed my discovery to Tars Tarkas, who suggested that I explore aloft as far as I could go in safety while he guarded the entrance against a possible attack.
As I hastened above to explore the strange shaft I found that the ladder of horizontal bars mounted always as far above me as my eyes could reach, and as I ascended, the light from above grew brighter and brighter.
Knowing that attack from the tree was now improbable, we determined to explore the cave, which we had every reason to believe was but a continuation of the path we had already traversed, leading the gods alone knew where, but quite evidently away from this valley of grim ferocity.
Finally, in 1857, Lieutenants Burton and Speke, both officers in the Bengal army, were sent by the London Geographical Society to explore the great African lakes, and on the 17th of June they quitted Zanzibar, and plunged directly into the west.
The men of Torquas had perfected huge guns with which their uncanny marksmanship had permitted them to repulse the few determined efforts that near-by red nations had made to explore their country by means of battle fleets of airships.
And from the way I line it up, I'll explore a whole lot more quickly by myself.
Be rather the Mungo Park, the Lewis and Clark and Frobisher, of your own streams and oceans; explore your own higher latitudes -- with shiploads of preserved meats to support you, if they be necessary; and pile the empty cans sky-high for a sign.
If you would learn to speak all tongues and conform to the customs of all nations, if you would travel farther than all travellers, be naturalized in all climes, and cause the Sphinx to dash her head against a stone, even obey the precept of the old philosopher, and Explore thyself.
A final chapter explores Schiller's intertextuality in the twentieth century, as well as the persistence of his ideals of freedom and aesthetic education in modern permutations, notably Anthony Burgess' "A Clockwork Orange" novel and movie.
Purmensky explores expanding roles for technology in enhancing reflective feedback in service-learning courses, building capacity in collaboration with community partners, and strengthening learning communities.
The Adlerian lifestyle assessment (Shulman & Mosak, 1988) explores the client's subjective frame of reference from three perspectives: (a) the client's basic orientation to life, (b) the client's social interest that begins in childhood and involves finding a place in society and acquiring a sense of belonging and of contributing, and (c) the client as understood from a social context.