explicit

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explicit

(ĕk-splĭs′ĭt) [L. explicare, to unfold, set forth]
1. Clearly and definitively stated.
2. Unequivocal.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is all the more true in the case of the Eighteen Canzonets, given that they are vocal music, with the relative explicitness afforded by the presence of texts.
For in fact for all its explicitness, Protocol No6 applied only to peacetime, and many otherwise abolitionist countries including Britain retained the death penalty in respect of crimes committed in time of war.
The watchdog said: "Our concerns were with the style and sexual explicitness of the promotions.
2000) Feedback The teacher gives timely, focused and explicit literacy feedback to children (Bloom, 1976, Hattie, 2003; Strickland, 2002) Responsiveness The teacher shares and builds on children's literacy contributions (Brophy & Good, 1986; Hattie, 2003) Explicitness The teacher directs children's attention to explicit Word level word and sound strategies (Mazzoli & Gambrell, 2003; NRP, 2000; Snow et al.
The museum is renowned for its collection of pre-Colombian erotic pottery, which depicts with remarkable explicitness the sexual activities of Peruvian men, women, animals and - bizarrely - skeletons.
Sadly, in these torrid times many self-proclaimed artists confuse explicitness with honesty; innovation with in-your-facism.
Two comparable, intensive tutorial treatments differed only in the degree of explicitness of the comprehension strategy instruction.
Good thing these family associations who are watching out for us weren't around during the explicitness of my National Geographic topless aborigines days, to say nothing of my dear, dear Sears lingerie catalogs.
Innocent conversation to win the target's trust degenerates into casual bribery then full-on sexual explicitness.
A grim, gritty look at an interracial love affair, the film owes much of its sexual explicitness to its Swiss director, Marc Foster.
Nevertheless, she found Je Louse (and Elliot's other books) embarrassing for their sexual explicitness, and she has never been terribly comfortable with the fictionalized depictions of herself, her husband, and their small town.