explicit

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explicit

(ĕk-splĭs′ĭt) [L. explicare, to unfold, set forth]
1. Clearly and definitively stated.
2. Unequivocal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, our analysis tested the mediating effect of explicitness (as measured by students' explicit position and explicit argument frequencies) on the relationship between the agent intervention mode and the learning outcomes.
Textual explicitness differs from the type of explicitness dealt with above, in that it is more a matter of a degree than just a category.
Explicitness of the objective [(explicitness of the objective by Bloom's cognitive domain taxonomy (good, moderate, bad)]
For example, the level of explicitness used to model different mathematics concepts and processes would increase from tier 1 to tier 2.
The explicitness of the presentation concerns the degree of completeness of task specification, and then ambiguity is greater when tasks are less explicit (Tinning and Siedentop, 1985).
Raunchy is another word that has been attached to it, although the shock registered by some supposedly worldly-wise critics at the alleged explicitness of the Don's various couplings seems a bit surprising.
The work of two Inquisitors, Henricus Institoris and Jacobus Sprenger, this neo-Latin text is legendary for its misogyny and sexual explicitness.
The differences in the two candidates' positions focus on the explicitness with which a timetable for withdrawal should be announced and planned for ahead of time.
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky for homosexuality, sexual explicitness, offensive language, and material unsuited to its age group;
There is the ocassional orgy of suggestive body grinding and passing reference to the burlesque, but the performance will disappoint if sexual explicitness is what you're looking for.
As someone who does work similar to his in the field of poetry, I would draw attention to the fact that Italy has produced a very vigorous homoerotic tradition in poetry which starts early in the century with Saba and already in the 1920s, with the work of Penna, reaches a level of explicitness and articulation hardly matched in contemporary prose texts.
including an attraction to underage women and his sexual explicitness on the internet, including revealing his private parts.