expiratory


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Related to expiratory: inspiratory, expiratory reserve volume, expiratory stridor

ex·pi·ra·to·ry

(ek-spī'ră-tō-rē), Avoid the mispronunciation with stress on the first syllable.
Relating to expiration.

expiratory

(ĭk-spī′rə-tôr′ē)
adj.
Of, relating to, or involving the expiration of air from the lungs.

ex·pi·ra·to·ry

(eks-pī'ră-tōr-ē)
Relating to expiration.

ex·pi·ra·to·ry

(eks-pī'ră-tōr-ē) Avoid the mispronunciation with stress on the first syllable.
Relating to expiration.

expiratory

relating to or employed in the expiration of air from the lungs.

expiratory center
the nerve center in the descending reticular formation which terminates inspiration and triggers the commencement of expiratory movements.
expiratory groan
a groan with each expiration; usually an expression of severe pain or extreme fatigue.
expiratory reserve volume
the volume of air which the patient can still exhale after the tidal volume has been exhaled.
References in periodicals archive ?
Often reported benefits are: Increased inspiratory muscle strength Reduced breathlessness Increased exercise performance Improved quality of life OPEP: Designed to interrupt the expiratory airflow, which results in the airways vibrating and thus loosening mucus.
In a sense, effective use of high frequency ventilation depends on it--as may Airway Pressure Release Ventilation (APRV) when external PEEP is set to zero, as advocated by some physicians to allow efficient expiratory flow across the valve.
s devices work by creating expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP).
Many commercial PEP devices are flow-resistors with expiration occurring through a fixed orifice and the positive pressure generated varying with the expiratory airflow (Mestriner et al 2009).
We measured the Peak Expiratory Flow Rate ( PEFR), the rate at which a person exhales, to assess lung function.
In one study after a period of aerobic swimming exercises, the results showed dynamic volumes and capacities (forced expiratory volume in one second, %[FEV.
The minimum requirements for basic office spirometers include forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV) and peak expiratory flow (PEF).
Pathological changes are associated with the following laboratory findings: an obstructive ventilatory pattern on respiratory function tests such as a decline in forced expiratory volume% in one second (forced expiratory volume 1%) and an increase in the residual volume; characteristic end-expiratory mosaic pattern in the lung images on high resolution CT, reflecting air-trapping alveoli mixed with normally collapsed alveoli in the lung fields6.
Some researchers found that the longer kids were breastfed, the better they performed on tests of forced expiratory flow.
For this study, multiple lung function tests were performed and significant changes were noted in four measurements: the FVC, or forced vital capacity, which reflects the volume of air that can be blown out after fully inhaling; the FEV1, or forced expiratory volume in 1 second, which is the volume of air that can forcibly be blown out in one second, after fully inhaling; the FEF, or forced expiratory flow, which reflects the flow of air coming out of the lungs during the middle portion of a forced exhalation; and the PEF, or peak expiratory flow, which is the maximal flow achieved when air is forcibly exhaled immediately after being inhaled.
The results were not markedly different when the studies that enrolled only patients with GERD were analyzed; however, the average change in morning peak expiratory flow readings was higher.