expert witness


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expert witness

[ikspurt′, ek′spərt]
Etymology: L, experiri, to try; AS, witnes, knowledge
a person who has special knowledge of a subject about which a court requests testimony. Special knowledge may be acquired by experience, education, observation, or study but is not possessed by the average person. An expert witness provides testimony or informed opinions on evidence. This evidence often serves to educate the court and the jury in the subject under consideration.
A person qualified by education, training, experience, occupation, present position, degrees held, publications and professional organization membership that establishes authority as an expert to give opinions

expert witness

Forensic medicine A person qualified by education, training, experience, occupation, present position, degrees held, publications and professional organization membership that establishes authority as an expert to give opinions; EWs are permitted to offer opinions in court related to their area of expertise which would not be permitted a witness without such status. See Expert. Cf Hired gun, Whore.

ex·pert wit·ness

(eks'pĕrt wit'nĕs)
In health care, someone with special training who testifies for the defense or prosecution in a court case to clarify esoteric points for the jury or judge.

expert witness,

n a person sufficiently trained in a given area of expertise who can give testimony relevant to a case in court.

ex·pert wit·ness

(eks'pĕrt wit'nĕs)
In health care, someone with special training who testifies for the defense or prosecution in court.
References in periodicals archive ?
The overriding duty of an expert witness is to the court.
During last month's cross-examination of expert witness Gary Platt -- another covert cellular networks specialist -- defense counselor Vincent Courcelle-Labrousse similarly found that Platt could not confirm the accuracy of cellular coverage maps.
Because trials are often adjudicated by a jury composed of individuals with little financial expertise, a potential expert witness should possesses the communication skills necessary to present difficult and complex issues in a manner that can be easily understood by laypersons.
Two books--one on being a witness, one on how to develop an expert witness practice--that I would specifically recommend are:
Several cases state that paying consulting firms involved in providing expert witnesses for litigants on a contingent-fee basis is improper, even if the expert witness himself is not directly involved in the different payment schemes of his affiliated company.
The first is related to the title of the book (The Expert Witness in Islamic Courts), which, in fact, only applies to the first part of the hook.
Each expert witness profile starts with an overview page, which is actually a snapshot of a witness'background that highlights case history, a track record of involvement in cases won/lost, as well as specific court documents under the Depositions & Transcripts tab whether the cases are tried in the local or federal courts.
The specialty of the expert witness should be appropriate to the subject matter in the case.
The role of the expert witness in court has been a point for discussion in medical and legal circles for many decades.
I read "Daubert and the Appraisal Expert Witness Revisited" (Spring 2008) hoping for some insight on recent cases.
Zaremski's attempt to mischaracterize peer review of expert witness testimony as an effort to silence those who would give such testimony ("Expert Witnesses Under Fire," Guest Editorial, Aug.