expense

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ex·pense

(eks-pens')
That which is given in exchange for something else; cost.
[L. expendo, to pay out]
References in classic literature ?
In my confidence in my own resources, I would willingly have taken Herbert's expenses on myself; but Herbert was proud, and I could make no such proposal to him.
In the first case this liberality is dangerous, in the second it is very necessary to be considered liberal; and Caesar was one of those who wished to become pre-eminent in Rome; but if he had survived after becoming so, and had not moderated his expenses, he would have destroyed his government.
Passengers can remain on board of the steamer, at all ports, if they desire, without additional expense, and all boating at the expense of the ship.
This I decided to sell, in order to get a little money for travelling expenses.
If I knew the items of election expenses I could scare him.
All we could spare from the supply of our humble wardrobe and our little casual expenses, he directed us to put into the savings'-bank; saying, we knew not how soon we might be dependent on that alone for support: for he felt he had not long to be with us, and what would become of our mother and us when he was gone, God only knew!
One day he met a friend, a Fuller, and entreated him to come and live with him, saying that they should be far better neighbors and that their housekeeping expenses would be lessened.
Upon the ground," said the Attorney, "that after paying all fees and expenses of litigation and all charges against the estate there will still be something left.
Eustace, of the estimated expenses of the whole proceeding.
Show me a woman--and I'll show ye a man not far off wha' has mair expenses on his back than he ever bairgained for.
And besides, on that day, as it was the fifteenth, he had to give his wife some money for her expenses, according to their usual arrangement.
Now as this law, under a modified form, is to this day in force in England; and as it offers in various respects a strange anomaly touching the general law of Fast and Loose-Fish, it is here treated of in a separate chapter, on the same courteous principle that prompts the English railways to be at the expense of a separate car, specially reserved for the accommodation of royalty.