expense


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ex·pense

(eks-pens')
That which is given in exchange for something else; cost.
[L. expendo, to pay out]
References in classic literature ?
That the field is sufficiently wide will more fully appear when we come to advert to the inconsiderable share of the public expenses for which it will fall to the lot of the State governments to provide.
I might have retorted, "He thinks of the expense before he thinks of anything else.
Five dollars per day, in gold, it is believed, will be a fair calculation to make for all traveling expenses onshore and at the various points where passengers may wish to leave the steamer for days at a time.
Show me a woman--and I'll show ye a man not far off wha' has mair expenses on his back than he ever bairgained for.
Other great and inevitable expenses too we have had on first coming to Norland.
Give a girl an education, and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without farther expense to anybody.
This I decided to sell, in order to get a little money for travelling expenses.
If I knew the items of election expenses I could scare him.
She answered by handing me over her share of the proceeds at Derby and Nottingham -- and there were my expenses paid, at the rate of nearly two guineas a day.
Pope Julius the Second was assisted in reaching the papacy by a reputation for liberality, yet he did not strive afterwards to keep it up, when he made war on the King of France; and he made many wars without imposing any extraordinary tax on his subjects, for he supplied his additional expenses out of his long thriftiness.
One day he met a friend, a Fuller, and entreated him to come and live with him, saying that they should be far better neighbors and that their housekeeping expenses would be lessened.
Yesterday he added that, had he but known, but foreseen, these expenses, he would never have married.