expectancy-value theory


Also found in: Wikipedia.

expectancy-value theory

in psychology, the theory that behaviour is a function of the interaction between a person's expectancies about the outcomes of actions and the value they place on those outcomes. For example, a person might engage in regular exercise because they believe that exercise is good for their health and they also value good health.
References in periodicals archive ?
These values fall under a broad category of motivation known as expectancy-value theory.
Several theories such as expectancy-value theory (Feather, 1992; Vansteenkiste, Lens, De Witte, & Feather, 2005), self-determination theory (Vansteenkiste et al.
Expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation: A developmental perspective.
According to expectancy-value theory (Wigfield & Eccles, 2000) and other theories of academic motivation, students' self-beliefs and academic choices have a reciprocal relationship; a change in one facilitates a change in the other.
These results are similar to work that has been done with expectancy-value theory (see Eccles & Wigfield, 1995), which shows that, in general, value components do not directly influence achievement, but rather are closely tied to students' choice of future enrollment in similar courses.
Using expectancy-value theory, the Technology Implementation Questionnaire (TIQ) was developed; it consists of 33 belief items grouped under three broad motivational categories: perceived expectancy of success, perceived value of technology use, and perceived cost of technology use.
One approach to investigating achievement motivation is expectancy-value theory, which suggests several important determinants of achievement: the value placed on the task to be done, the motivation or desire to accomplish the task, perception of the difficulty of the task, and confidence in one's ability to accomplish the task (Eccles, 1983; Pintrich & Schunk, 1996; Wigfield, 1994a).
Expectancy-value theory is one of the key strands of motivation research.
Expectancy-value theory (Porter and Lawler, 1968, Vroom, 1964, Bandura et al.
According to expectancy-value theory, individuals choose behaviors based on the outcomes they expect and the values they ascribe to those expected outcomes.