expectancy-value theory


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expectancy-value theory

in psychology, the theory that behaviour is a function of the interaction between a person's expectancies about the outcomes of actions and the value they place on those outcomes. For example, a person might engage in regular exercise because they believe that exercise is good for their health and they also value good health.
References in periodicals archive ?
Expectancy-Value Theory has been well-known in the works of educational scientists (Eccles and Wigfield, 1995, 2002; McCormick and McPherson, 2007).
The expectancy-value theory assumes that individuals with a higher expectancy in terms of outcome will behave differently when compared to those with a low expectancy (Jorgenson and Dunnette, 1973).
Designed within the context of the expectancy-value theory of motivation (Wigfield & Eccles, 2000), the Ag Ed FIT Choice[R] model provides a guide for describing why people choose the career of teaching in SBAE.
Because Grade 9 students are adolescents who vary in their motivation to perform tasks and also who are at an important developmental stage, we used two theoretical frameworks to interpret and discuss our results, expectancy-value theory of motivation and the development of decision-making autonomy in adolescents.
The expectancy-value theory posits that students' achievement and continued interest in learning statistics can, in part, be explained by their expectations about successfully performing statistical tasks in the class and the degree to which they value those tasks.
Rozek and his colleagues focused broadly on what is known as expectancy-value theory and, more specifically, on the concept that individuals make choices depending on the relevance or usefulness to a current or future goal.
Expectancy-value theory is applicable for understanding achievement motivation in a variety of activity contexts (Eccles et ah, 1983; Fredricks & Eccles, 2005; Wigfield et ah, 1997).
Value is part of Wigfield and Eccles's (2002) expectancy-value theory of motivation in which value relates to perceptions of relevance, meaning, or voluntary engagement even beyond the classroom.
Expectancy-value theory offers an important view of the nature of achievement motivation (Wigfield, 1994).
Expectancy-value theory is a useful framework in considering teachers' value for teaching knowledge.
The expectancy-value theory proposed by Atkinson in 1957 is one of the most prominent motivational theories in the field of educational psychology.