exoteric


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ex·o·ter·ic

(ek'sō-ter'ik),
Of external origin; arising outside the organism.
[G. exōterikos, outer]

exoteric

[ek′səter′ik]
Etymology: Gk, exoterikos, external
lying outside an organism.

ex·o·ter·ic

(eks'ō-ter'ik)
Of external origin; arising outside the organism.
[G. exōterikos, outer]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The esoteric culture may be regarded as belonging to what Don Juan calls the realm of the 'Nagual' or the Sorcerer's World, and the exoteric or public culture belongs to the 'Tonal.
Thus we have the ideological foundation of 'free-market', or exoteric, neoliberalism.
He subjects Islam itself to the same criteria he uses to judge Bandarshah, as illustrated by his repeated denigration of exoteric (scripturalist) Islam or worldly materialistic Islam.
The apocalypse is portrayed in exoteric Christianity as a final battle between God and the Devil, after which will reign peace on Earth forever.
Rather, I choose this term to work within the confines of acceptable Mariology and Christology, while being aware of exoteric and esoteric interpretations.
4 for health information (being passive) Table 7: Respondent's reason for referring to the public library Respondent's reason for referring to the public N(%) library Proper number of health resources 42(21%) Simple and exoteric resources 61(30.
Another classic example is how Afghan Islamists are obsessed with exoteric rituals.
The exoteric interactions between housed pedestrians and street kids was such that my participants carefully orchestrated their behaviour to counteract negative stereotypes that defined them as dangerous, shiftless and members of the undeserving poor.
This so alive and creative "elan" grasped through exoteric and esoteric affinities, shows more than just a display of intellectual and stylistic bravado.
In their excerpted conversations around which all the other filmic elements revolve, Snyder and Harrison touch upon many of the themes familiar to readers of Snyder's work over the last 50 years; however, those new to Snyder will not feel lost because the way in which the two authors converse is casual and exoteric rather than formal and esoteric.
Curiously, al-Ghazzali regarded the common folk as not only laypersons but also scholars of the exoteric Islamic sciences, including jurists (fuqaha'), theologians (mutakallimun), exegetes (mufassirun), hadith scholars (muhadiththun), grammarians (nuhat), and the like.