exostosis

(redirected from exostoses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to exostoses: osteochondroma, cholesteatoma, osteomas

exostosis

 [ek″sos-to´sis] (Gr.)
a benign new growth projecting from a bone surface and characteristically capped by cartilage. adj., adj exostot´ic.
exostosis cartilagi´nea a variety of osteoma consisting of a layer of cartilage developing beneath the periosteum of a bone.
hereditary multiple exostosis a generally benign, hereditary disorder of enchondral growth of bone, marked by exostoses near the extremities of the diaphysis of long bones.

ex·os·to·sis

, pl.

ex·os·to·ses

(eks'os-tō'sis, -sēz),
A cartilage-capped bony projection arising from any bone that develops from cartilage.
See also: osteochondroma.
Synonym(s): hyperostosis (2) , poroma (2)
[exo- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

exostosis

/ex·os·to·sis/ (ek″sos-to´sis)
1. a benign bony growth projecting outward from a bone surface.
2. osteochondroma.exostot´ic

exostosis cartilagi´nea  a variety of osteoma consisting of a layer of cartilage developing beneath the periosteum of a bone.
ivory exostosis  compact osteoma.
multiple exostoses  an inherited condition in which multiple cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous excrescences grow out from the cortical surfaces of long bones.
subungual exostosis  a cartilage-capped reactive bone spur occurring on the distal phalanx, usually of the great toe.

exostosis

(ĕk′sŏ-stō′sĭs)
n. pl. exosto·ses (-sēz)
A bony growth on the surface of a bone or tooth.

exostosis

[ek′sostō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, exo + osteon, bone
an abnormal benign growth on the surface of a bone. Also called hyperostosis. exostosed, exostotic, adj.
enlarge picture
Exostosis

ex·os·to·sis

, pl. exostoses (eks'os-tō'sis, -sēz)
A cartilage-capped bony projection arising from any bone that develops from cartilage.
See also: osteochondroma
Synonym(s): hyperostosis (2) , poroma (2) .
[exo- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

exostosis

An outgrowth from the surface of a bone, usually in response to inflammation or repeated trauma. The commonest form of exostosis is the bunion caused by abnormal local pressure from unsuitable footwear.

exostosis

cartilage-capped bony projection

ex·os·to·sis

, pl. exostoses (eks'os-tō'sis, -sēz)
Cartilage-capped bony projection arising from any bone that develops from cartilage.
[exo- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

exostosis (pl. exostoses) (ek´sos-tō´sis),

n (hyperostosis) a bony growth projecting from a bony surface.
Enlarge picture
Mandibular tori exostosis.

exostosis

pl. exostoses [Gr.] a benign new growth projecting from a bone surface and characteristically capped by cartilage.

exostosis cartilaginea
a variety of osteoma consisting of a layer of cartilage developing beneath the periosteum of a bone.
inherited multiple exostosis
a benign hereditary disorder in horses. The lesions are visible externally but appear to cause little inconvenience. Similar to multiple cartilaginous exostoses (see below) in dogs and cats.
multiple cartilaginous e's
multiple bony exostoses in bones formed by enchondral ossification are seen in young dogs, usually on vertebrae, ribs and long bones. Adult cats are infrequently affected, and mainly on cranial bones. The bony enlargements are painless, but may cause musculoskeletal or neurological dysfunction. Neoplastic transformation has been reported. An hereditary basis is suspected in dogs. Called also diaphyseal aclasis, metaphyseal aclasis, osteochondromatosis, and in horses, inherited multiple exostosis (see above). See also osteophyte.
periarticular exostosis
occurs in any joint injury, commencing as cartilaginous osteophytes within a few days of the injury occurring.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is controversial whether exostoses that lie near a vascular axis should be removed on identification to prevent vascular compromise from occurring.
Several tarsal bones have exostoses and changes probably caused by inflammations--in one case III and IV tarsal bones are fused, in one case III and IV tarsal bones and os tarsale centrale are fused.
HME is a medical condition in which multiple bony spurs or lumps - also known as exostoses - develop on the bones of a child.
3,6,14,15) Multiple hereditary exostoses are a rare, autosomal dominant, polyostotic form of the disease that has an increased risk of malignant transformation.
We report an interesting case of a patient who presented with gradual onset of deafness and external auditory canal swellings, mistaken initially for multiple simple exostoses of both ear canals, in combination with mild background sensorineural hearing loss.
It has been demonstrated that the human exostoses-like family (EXTL1, -2, and -3) is responsible for the heparin/heparan sulfate chain initiation with the attachment of the first and second GlcNAc residues and that the exostoses enzymes extosin-1 and -2 are the copolymerases that elongate the GAG chain with [(GlcA[beta]1-4GlcNAc[alpha]1-4).
Each of her six children has Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), an incurable bone disease which can cause severe pain and crippling disfigurement.
At the age of just six Ryan was diagnosed with hereditary multiple exostoses - a condition that sees lumps growing on their bones and only affects just one in every 50,000 people.
While exostoses are believed to represent periosteal reactions secondary to multiple cold-water immersions, (1) osteomas are considered to be true bone tumors.
EXT-1 encodes the glycosyltransferase exostosin-1 involved in the development of osteochondroma and multiple hereditary exostoses.
Christine Spencer, from Ouston, Chester-le-Street, is organising the event because her eight-year-old son Ryan has multiple exostoses, a condition where extra bone grows in and around joints, causing pain and discomfort.
She suffers from multiple exostoses, a rare inherited condition that causes bony lumps to grow at the end of some of her bones and press against her muscles.