exoskeleton


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Related to exoskeleton: Hydrostatic skeleton

exoskeleton

 [ek″so-skel´ĕ-ton]
an external hard framework to the bodies of certain animals, derived from the ectoderm, such as a crustacean's shell; it supports and protects the soft tissues. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, such as hair, nails, hoofs, and teeth.

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(ek'sō-skel'ĕ-tŏn),
1. Hard parts (for example, hair, teeth, nails, feathers, hooves, scales) developed from the epidermis in vertebrates. Synonym(s): dermoskeleton
2. Outer chitinous envelope of an insect, or the chitinous or calcareous covering of certain crustaceans and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

/exo·skel·e·ton/ (-skel´ĕ-ton) a hard structure formed on the outside of the body, as a crustacean's shell; in vertebrates, applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, nails, hoofs, teeth, etc.

exoskeleton

[ek′səskel′ətən]
Etymology: Gk, exo, outside, skeletos, dried up
the hard outer covering of many invertebrates, such as crustaceans, which lack the bony internal skeleton of vertebrates. Compare endoskeleton.
A powered suit of armour being developed for military and construction applications which will protect and augment its wearer’s strength

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(eks'ō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
1. All hard parts (e.g., hair, teeth, nails, feathers, dermal plates, and scales), developed from the ectoderm or somatic mesoderm in vertebrates.
2. Outer chitinous envelope of insects, some crustaceous, and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

a skeleton present on the outside of an organism as in ARTHROPODS or MOLLUSCS. Some vertebrates possess an exoskeleton in addition to an ENDOSKELETON, for example, armadillos and turtles. The exoskeleton may lie outside the EPIDERMIS, as in the arthropods, or inside, as in vertebrates such as scaly fish, tortoises, etc.

exoskeleton

an external hard framework, as a crustacean's shell, that supports and protects the soft tissues of lower animals, derived from the ectoderm. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, claws, hoofs, teeth, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The brain and the spinal cord is very adaptable and it is hoped that increasing spinal neuron stimulation through Exoskeleton and Virtual Reality will help increase the stem cells effects.
This time, I will use brain signals via electroencephalography (or EEG) to control the robotic hand exoskeleton.
Caption: Retired Marine Corps veteran James Smith takes his first steps with an exoskeleton.
The key function of a hand exoskeleton device is the ability to decrease the stiffness of the contracture finger.
Once you have decided to build your exoskeleton, you should decide which type you want.
Chen and his team also are exploring controlling the exoskeleton via a patient's electromyography (EMG) and EEG signals.
Wearing the exoskeleton it's easy to imagine one with arms built to specifically carry certain type of tools, maybe even with batteries for power tools instead of dead metal as the counterweight.
Exoskeleton markets will be separate and additive to this market.
Some form of exoskeleton tech has been showing up in the news since the last five years, in the form of limb augmentations and locomotion assistance.
Industrial workers and warfighters can perform at a higher level when wearing an exoskeleton.
But a revolutionary, wearable piece of kit called a bionic exoskeleton has allowed the Welshman to take his first steps since the accident.
A battery pack worn as a backpack powers the exoskeleton for up to eight hours.