exoskeleton

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exoskeleton

 [ek″so-skel´ĕ-ton]
an external hard framework to the bodies of certain animals, derived from the ectoderm, such as a crustacean's shell; it supports and protects the soft tissues. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, such as hair, nails, hoofs, and teeth.

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(ek'sō-skel'ĕ-tŏn),
1. Hard parts (for example, hair, teeth, nails, feathers, hooves, scales) developed from the epidermis in vertebrates. Synonym(s): dermoskeleton
2. Outer chitinous envelope of an insect, or the chitinous or calcareous covering of certain crustaceans and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

/exo·skel·e·ton/ (-skel´ĕ-ton) a hard structure formed on the outside of the body, as a crustacean's shell; in vertebrates, applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, nails, hoofs, teeth, etc.

exoskeleton

[ek′səskel′ətən]
Etymology: Gk, exo, outside, skeletos, dried up
the hard outer covering of many invertebrates, such as crustaceans, which lack the bony internal skeleton of vertebrates. Compare endoskeleton.
A powered suit of armour being developed for military and construction applications which will protect and augment its wearer’s strength

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(eks'ō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
1. All hard parts (e.g., hair, teeth, nails, feathers, dermal plates, and scales), developed from the ectoderm or somatic mesoderm in vertebrates.
2. Outer chitinous envelope of insects, some crustaceous, and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

a skeleton present on the outside of an organism as in ARTHROPODS or MOLLUSCS. Some vertebrates possess an exoskeleton in addition to an ENDOSKELETON, for example, armadillos and turtles. The exoskeleton may lie outside the EPIDERMIS, as in the arthropods, or inside, as in vertebrates such as scaly fish, tortoises, etc.

exoskeleton

an external hard framework, as a crustacean's shell, that supports and protects the soft tissues of lower animals, derived from the ectoderm. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, claws, hoofs, teeth, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If Rodgers' work has an exoskeletal quality, Zoghbi appears to have taken a fancy to the skeleton.
Intact scorpion carcasses and exuvia were photographed, and the following exoskeletal characteristics were recorded for each specimen: 1) curvature of the mesosoma and metasoma; 2) presence or absence of telescoped mesosomal and metasomal segments; 3) position/orientation of the chelicerae; 4) position/orientation of the walking legs; and 5) position/orientation of the pedipalps.
The giant robots are large exoskeletal structures, usually fighting machines, which require one or more human pilots.
Although others have evaluated injuries to the exoskeleton in an attempt to predict mortality (Stevens, 1990), a thorough assessment of exoskeletal injuries is time consuming and minor and potentially fatal injuries, such as finely cracked carapaces, are easily missed.
The development of the exoskeleton spurred the recent acquisition of Sarcos Exoskeletal Robots, Inc.
To determine these unknowns there are o lot of methods, such as: exoskeletal method, accelerometry method and stereometric method (Medved, 2001).
The fusion of the fleshy wholeness of the human to the exoskeletal segmentation of the insect typically suggests the grotesque in popular culture and the catastrophic in science fiction narratives.
variety of exoskeletal defense" employed by "people who
This results in an almost exoskeletal roof/sill/fender structure from which the rest of the vehicle appears suspended.
Projects will lead to self-powered, controlled and wearable exoskeletal devices and/or machines and demonstrations of their utility in military applications.
Presaging ISN exoskeletal designs, this programmable molecular armor makes Hardware "a truly devastating weapon" (34).