exoenzyme


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to exoenzyme: extracellular enzyme

exoenzyme

 [ek″so-en´zīm]
an enzyme that acts outside the cell that secretes it.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

an enzyme performing its functions outside a cell, for example, the various digestive enzymes.
Synonym(s): exoenzyme

exoenzyme

/exo·en·zyme/ (-en´zīm) an enzyme that acts outside the cell which secretes it.

exoenzyme

(ĕk′sō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An enzyme, such as a digestive enzyme, that functions outside the cell from which it originates.

exoenzyme

[ek′sō·en′zīm]
an enzyme that does not function within the cells from which it is secreted.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

(eks'tră-sel'yŭ-lăr en'zīm)
An enzyme performing its functions outside a cell (e.g., the various digestive enzymes).
Synonym(s): exoenzyme.

exoenzyme

An enzyme that operates outside the cell in which it was formed.

exoenzyme,

n any enzyme that works outside the cells in which it is synthesized.

exoenzyme

an enzyme that acts outside the cell that secretes it.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This bacterium regulates the production of different exoenzymes by secreting AHLs, including N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-O-C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-O-C8-HSL) (Jones et al.
It is also known that high production of trypsin-like exoenzymes is characteristic of pathogenic forms of fungi [29].
Additionally, we determined the production of some pathogenicity-related exoenzymes (hemolysin, gelatinase, and elastase) to better characterize these isolates in an attempt to correlate exoenzyme production with colony morphology.
The frequency of production of the exoenzymes hemolysin, gelatinase and elastase by each bacterial group is shown in Table 1.
In addition, some organisms produce a variety of exoenzymes for degrading large extracellular biological molecules for metabolism.
Most members of this toxin family, which includes the large clostridial cytotoxins and the C3 exoenzyme of C.
Synbiotics serve as a source of exoenzymes which induces the hosts' digestive enzymes and improves the absorptive ability of the host (Huynh et al.
The synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides is a prominent factor of its virulence, since even before the sucrose enters the cell, a percentage is transformed by exoenzymes, glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) and fructosiltransferasas (Ftf), which metabolize sucrose in monosaccharide molecules, transferring each fraction to a receiving molecule and forming polymers that can be spread in the biofilm or remain associated with S.
The production of exoenzymes and hemolysins are defense mechanisms of microorganisms during their colonization and pathogenesis.