exocytosis


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exocytosis

 [ek″so-si-to´sis]
1. the discharge from a cell of particles that are too large to diffuse through the wall; the opposite of endocytosis.
2. the aggregation of migrating leukocytes in the epidermis as part of the inflammatory response.

ex·o·cy·to·sis

(ek'sō-sī-to'sis),
1. The appearance of migrating inflammatory cells in the epidermis.
2. The process whereby secretory granules or droplets are released from a cell; the membrane around the granule fuses with the cell membrane, which ruptures, and the secretion is discharged. Synonym(s): emeiocytosis, emiocytosis Compare: endocytosis.
[exo- + G. kytos, cell, + -osis, condition]

exocytosis

/exo·cy·to·sis/ (-si-to´sis)
1. the discharge from a cell of particles that are too large to diffuse through the wall; the opposite of endocytosis.
2. the aggregation of migrating leukocytes in the epidermis as part of the inflammatory response.

exocytosis

(ĕk′sō-sī-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. exocyto·ses (-sēz′)
A process of cellular secretion or excretion in which substances contained in vesicles are discharged from the cell by fusion of the vesicular membrane with the outer cell membrane.

ex′o·cy·tose′ (-tōs′) v.
ex′o·cy·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

exocytosis

[ek′sōsītō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, exos, outside + kytos, a hollow vessel
discharge from a cell of particles that are too large to diffuse through the wall. Compare endocytosis.

ex·o·cy·to·sis

(eksō-sī-tōsis)
1. The appearance of migrating inflammatory cells in the epidermis.
2. The process whereby secretory granules or droplets are released from a cell; the membrane around the granule fuses with the cell membrane, which ruptures, and the secretion is discharged.
Synonym(s): emeiocytosis, emiocytosis.
Compare: endocytosis
[exo- + G. kytos, cell, + -osis, condition]

exocytosis

The movement of peptides or proteins out of a cell into the extracellular fluid, in tiny membranous vesicles that pass through the plasma membrane.

exocytosis

an active process in which vesicles containing excretory or secretory materials are actively carried to the periphery of the cell, and released to the outside when the vesicle membrane fuses with the cell membrane. Compare ENDOCYTOSIS. See PHAGOCYTOSIS, PINOCYTOSIS.

ex·o·cy·to·sis

(eksō-sī-tōsis)
Appearance of migrating inflammatory cells in the epidermis.
[exo- + G. kytos, cell, + -osis, condition]

exocytosis

(ek´sōsītō´sis),
n the active transport of material from a vesicle out into the extracellular environment.

exocytosis

1. the discharge from a cell of particles that are too large to diffuse through the plasma membrane; the opposite of endocytosis.
2. the aggregation of migrating leukocytes in the epidermis as part of the inflammatory response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Post-translational modifications of the known regulators of exocytosis will be studied.
In research published in this week's online edition of Science, postdoc Nicholas Vyleta and Professor Peter Jonas of the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) uncover the existence of loose coupling between calcium channels and release sensors of exocytosis at a mature central synapse in the rodent brain.
Activated platelets release two types of membrane vesicles: microvesicles by surface shedding and exosomes derived from exocytosis of multivesicular bodies and alpha-granules.
Neuronal exocytosis is triggered by calcium and requires 3 N-ethylmaleimide- sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins: synaptobrevin (Vesicle-associated membrane protein) on the synaptic vesicle, and syntaxin and synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) on the plasma membrane (10).
Mutations in the UNC13D gene (FHL3) interfere with the role Of the encoded protein Mune 13-4 in cytolytic granule exocytosis and FHL4 states the mutations in the STX11 gene and production of syntaxin 11, which also plays a role in cytotoxic granule release.
The expression of otoferlin, which is known to be present in the brain and is essential for glutamate exocytosis at the auditory ribbon synapse and reported to be defective in a recessive form of human deafness, showed significant decrease in the hippocampus of mice exposed to repeated blasts [19-20,40-42].
A sampling of topics: rhythmic kinetics of single fusion and fission in a plant cell protoplast; regulated exocytosis and vesicle trafficking in astrocytes; compound exocytosis in pituitary cells; the functions of Munc 18-1 in regulated exocytosis; voltage-gated potassium channel as a facilitator of exocytosis; rescuing the subprime meltdown in insulin exocytosis in diabetes; phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate-dependent facilitation of the ATP-dependent secretory activity in mouse pituitary cells; and calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.
One possibility may be through a process called exocytosis in which the gliotransmitters, which are enclosed within an astrocyte's vesicles, are actively discharged from the cell.
BTX-A appears to inhibit exocytosis of neurotransmitters and other neurally active substances (Hohne-Zell et al.
ZP not only plays a crucial role in fertilization by serving as a species-selective substrate for sperm binding but also acts as an agonist for regulated exocytosis of the spermatozoon's acrosomal vesicle (1).
Alcohol redirects CCK-mediated apical exocytosis to the acinar basolateral membrane in alcoholic pancreatitis.
This protein specifically localizes to the flagellar pocket, thought to be the sole site of cell sensory functions as well as endo- and exocytosis in this stage of parasite growth.