existential therapy


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existential therapy

a kind of psychotherapy that emphasizes the development of a sense of self-direction through choice, awareness, and acceptance of individual responsibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ottens and Hanna argue that while they are typically viewed as so far apart as to be incompatible, it is possible to merge them, and existential therapy is helpful in understanding clients' formation of core schemas that provide the basis for unhelpful beliefs and negative biases.
These contributions include a fascinating review of existential therapy in Lithuania by Professor Rimas Kociunas, the leading light of this School.
He describes the philosophical basis of existential thinking and how it is adapted to psychotherapy practice, methods of existential work and joining with clients, the role of resistance, the scientific evidence for existential therapy, the phases of psychotherapy, issues like gender and culture, life transitions, and applications of the method to group, family, and couples therapy, ending with a case study.
Goals for the client during existential therapy (ET) include (a) full presence, (b) confrontation of anxieties, and (c) redefining self and the world (Corey, 2009).
Keywords: Latinas, breast cancer, spirituality, existential therapy
In this book for practitioners and students, Van Deurzen, founder of the Society for Existential Analysis, uses simple terms to describe the method of existential therapy and outline interactions between the therapist and client.
Existential therapy is a philosophical approach to psychotherapy.
Existential therapy evolved to address angst often associated with living in a postagrarian society.
Keywords: Internet addiction, logotherapy, existential therapy, meaning and purpose, innovations in recovery
He further divides those 13 theories into three separate categories: (a) those that give empathy a significant focus, for example, person-centered therapy and self-psychology; (b) those that give empathy a prominent focus, such as individual psychology, existential therapy, psychoanalytic therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive therapy; and (c) those that address empathy as a recognizable aspect of the therapeutic process, like rational emotive behavior therapy, transactional analysis, solution-focused brief therapy, gestalt therapy, constructivist therapy, feminist therapy, and family systems therapy.
Teetering on the boundaries between philosophy and psychotherapy, existential therapy involves helping clients find meaning in their lives and emphasizes that the driving force in life is an innate spiritual desire to find this meaning.
Sixteen of the 19 chapters in this volume outline different types of therapy, from the Freudian approach to existential therapy and transactional analysis.