exhaustion


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Related to exhaustion: heat exhaustion

exhaustion

 [eg-zaws´chun]
1. a state of extreme mental or physical fatigue.
2. the state of being drained, emptied, consumed, or used up.
heat exhaustion see heat exhaustion.

ex·haus·tion

(eks-aw'chŭn),
1. Extreme fatigue; inability to respond to stimuli.
2. Removal of contents; using up of a supply of anything.
3. Extraction of the active constituents of a drug by treating with water, alcohol, or other solvent.
[L. ex-haurio, pp. -haustus, to draw out, empty]

exhaustion

/ex·haus·tion/ (eg-zaws´chun)
1. a state of extreme mental or physical fatigue.
2. the state of being drained, emptied, or consumed.

heat exhaustion  an effect of excessive exposure to heat, marked by subnormal body temperature with dizziness, headache, nausea, and sometimes delirium and/or collapse.

exhaustion

[igzôs′chən]
Etymology: L, exhaurire, to drain away
a state of extreme loss of physical or mental abilities caused by fatigue or illness.

exhaustion

A state of fatigue or physical consumption, pooped. See Secretory exhaustion.

ex·haus·tion

(eg-zaws'chŭn)
1. Extreme fatigue; inability to respond to stimuli.
2. Removal of contents; depletion of a supply of anything.
3. Extraction of the active constituents of a drug by treating with water, alcohol, or other solvent.
[L. ex-haurio, pp. -haustus, to draw out, empty]

fatigue

reduction in ability to sustain a physical or mental function as a consequence of the intensity and/or duration of the effort. Fatigue can last for periods ranging from a few tens of seconds to several days, its duration broadly correlating with that of the fatiguing activity, e.g. recovery from a 60 m sprint takes only a few minutes but few people would wish to run competitive marathons less than 7-10 days apart. See also central fatigue, glycogen, muscle fatigue.

ex·haus·tion

(eg-zaws'chŭn)
1. Extreme fatigue; inability to respond to stimuli.
2. Removal of contents; depletion of a supply of anything.
3. Extraction of the active constituents of a drug by treating with water, alcohol, or other solvent.
[L. ex-haurio, pp. -haustus, to draw out, empty]

exhaustion (egzôs´chən),

n the loss of vital and nervous power from fatigue or protracted disease.

exhaustion

privation of energy with consequent inability to respond to stimuli; lassitude.

heat exhaustion
an effect of excessive exposure to heat. See also heat exhaustion.
physical exhaustion
occurs most commonly in horses engaged in endurance or marathon events. Also in males engaged in territorial combats; bulls and boars are the usual combatants. There are some lacerations but exhaustion is the main problem. Manifested by lethargy, dehydration, hyperthermia, hyperpnea, tachycardia, muscle tremor and some muscle spasm, restlessness, anal relaxation, unwillingness to stand, fidgeting while down, pale cyanotic mucosa and poor capillary refill time.
exhaustion syndrome
in a fit horse normal levels of function in the cardiopulmonary system should be regained within 30 to 60 minutes of stopping work. This is unlikely with horses that are exhausted and which have the following clinical signs—lethargy, dehydration, hyperthermia, hyperpnea, tachycardia, muscle tremor, restlessness, relaxation of the anal sphincter, reluctance to stand, pale mucosa, poor capillary refill and a respiratory to cardiac rate ratio of greater than 2:1. Called also exhausted horse syndrome.

Patient discussion about exhaustion

Q. what causes physical exhaustion

A. Many things may cause weakness, depending on the specific characteristics of the individual and the situation. Heart diseases (stable angina) may cause weakness, as well as anemia, metabolic disorders (potassium abnormalities etc.). Other situations such as chronic diseases may also cause weakness.

However, I'm not very keen on diagnosing things over the net, so consulting a professional (e.g. a doctor) may be wise.
You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003174.htm

Q. my boyfriend is always exhausted - he wakes up exhausted and just has no energy thro' out the day - help he doesn't sleep well and gets exhausted just lifting a few heavy boxes etc. He's 48 and carries a few extra pounds around the waistline, but in my view this should not contribute to his extreme exhaustion - he pants heavily after doing medial tasks. He's not physically active and has a desk job.

A. It sounds like your boyfriend has sleep apnea. He needs to have an overnight sleep study done to see how many times he awakens during the night. Its amazing how much it could be. If he is diagnosed as such, he would need to use a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) respirator which would force air into his lungs to keep his airways open. It just means that he has an obsructive airway which could in fact be due to the weight around the middle. If this be the diagnosis and treatment, he would awaken fully refreshed and energetic. It is worth the time and trouble! Good luck!

Q. Can stress really affect your health?? I’ve been having a stressed period at work in the past three months. I heard a lot of times:” don’t stress up-it’ll kill you eventually..” but is it physically true?

A. defenitely true, it's been proven that stress might cause gastrointestinal desorders.

More discussions about exhaustion
References in classic literature ?
It was during one of these frequent periods of utter exhaustion that he heard the flap of dismal wings close above him.
Had he indeed been overcome by the sleep of exhaustion, or was Ska right--had death at last claimed that mighty body?
There are two causes for those signs of exhaustion which have surprised my medical attendant--and the names of them are--Anxiety and Suspense.
More than once I sank down on the coal where no one could see me, and cried with rage, and mortification, and exhaustion, and despair.
But my eyes must have closed the instant my head touched the pillow, and in utter exhaustion I slept throughout the night, the while the Ghost, lonely and undirected, fought her way through the storm.
The poor lady wavered backwards and forwards between a sort of sleepy exhaustion, which was half faintness and half slumbering, and attacks of fever which brought with them more or less of wandering in her mind.
We said nothing on the subject to Lady Glyde, who was then lying asleep, completely overpowered by exhaustion, on the sofa in the sitting-room.
I was not present at the time, but I understood that the subject of dispute was the amount of nourishment which it was necessary to give to assist Miss Halcombe's convalescence after the exhaustion of the fever.
The three worthies turned their faces towards The Boot, with the intention of passing the night in that place of rendezvous, and of seeking the repose they so much needed in the shelter of their old den; for now that the mischief and destruction they had purposed were achieved, and their prisoners were safely bestowed for the night, they began to be conscious of exhaustion, and to feel the wasting effects of the madness which had led to such deplorable results.
By these means Mr Chuckster was pushed and hustled to the office again, in a most inglorious manner, and arrived in a state of great exhaustion and discomfiture.
The former Strictly dancer broke down in tears as she struggled to cope with conditions in 2009 and had to go home, blaming her departure on exhaustion.
The study, published in the Journal of American College of Nutrition, included 12 male endurance athletes who performed four endurance trials, each consisting of 1-hour treadmill runs at 75% V02 peak (milliliters of oxygen per body weight per minute moved or utilized) followed by a run to exhaustion at 90% V02 peak.