exhale

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ex·hale

(eks-hāl'),
1. To breathe out. Synonym(s): expire (1)
2. To emit a gas or vapor or odor.

exhale

/ex·hale/ (eks´hāl) to breathe out.

exhale

(ĕks-hāl′, ĕk-sāl′)
v. ex·haled, ex·haling, ex·hales
v.intr.
1.
a. To breathe out.
b. To emit air or vapor.
2. To be given off or emitted.
v.tr.
1. To blow (something) forth or breathe (something) out.
2. To give off; emit: chimneys exhaling dense smoke.

exhale

See expire.

ex·hale

(eks-hāl')
1. To breathe out.
Synonym(s): expire (1) .
2. To emit a gas, vapor, or odor.

ex·hale

(eks-hāl')
1. To breathe out.
2. To emit a gas or vapor or odor.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the second arm is pulling under water, the swimmer is simultaneously exhaling to the count of 4-5-6.
Spinal twist -ease tension from the back by twisting from side to side, exhaling as you twist.
End the exercise by gently stretching and exhaling.
Start to rock back and forth gently, inhaling as you rock forward onto balls of feet, exhaling as you rock backward onto heels.
The region involved in exhaling had been named the Botzinger complex after a German wine that scientists were drinking when they announced its discovery, so Smith and Feldman dubbed the newly recognized area the pre-Botzinger complex (PBC).
To take the idea of dynamics further--or more deeply, perhaps--one of Mary's basic ideas was inhaling and exhaling; inhaling, building up tension, bringing it to a climax, and then exhaling, releasing tension, to again bring it to a different climax.
I find that many of my clients with high blood pressure are not exhaling fully and experience profound, measurable shifts in their heart when they learn to let go more fully.
The Andean people were exhaling 50 percent more nitric oxide than healthy people at sea level were, while the Tibetans exhaled more than twice as much, she reported.
Holding the breath in the lungs for about 20 seconds before exhaling allows "a nice [gas exchange] between your blood and the lung," Ott explains.