lactate

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lactate

 [lak´tāt]
1. any salt of lactic acid or the anion of lactic acid.
2. to secrete milk.

lac·tate

(lak'tāt),
1. A salt or ester of lactic acid.
2. To produce milk in the mammary glands.

lactate

/lac·tate/ (lak´tāt)
1. any salt or ester of lactic acid.
2. to secrete milk.

lactate 1

(lăk′tāt′)
intr.v. lac·tated, lac·tating, lac·tates
To secrete or produce milk.

lactate 2

(lăk′tāt′)
n.
A salt or ester of lactic acid.

lactate

[lak′tāt]
an anion of lactic acid.

lactate

Emergency medicine A salt or ester of lactic acid; the time required to normalize lactate is a useful prognostic tool in trauma victims. Cf 'Kiss of death' test.

lac·tate

(lak'tāt)
1. A salt or ester of lactic acid.
2. To produce milk in the mammary glands.

lactate

Lactic acid in the ionized state.

lactate

the anion of lactic acid and its salts, although the term 'lactate' is commonly, but incorrectly, used interchangeably with 'lactic acid' itself. At rest and during prolonged moderate exercise, lactate level in the blood is low (0.7-1.4 mmol.L-1). In short-term, high-intensity exercise, lactate production in muscles, and its efflux from them, exceeds its rate of removal from the circulating blood, causing a steep increase in the concentrations of lactate and of hydrogen ions [H+] both in muscle itself and in the blood. Lactate measured in blood therefore reflects the balance between release from exercising muscles and uptake (by the liver, cardiac muscle and any skeletal muscle fibres which are not themselves under anaerobic stress). Contrary to earlier assumptions, lactate is not itself deleterious to most physiological processes and can be used as fuel by well-oxygenated cells, including muscle fibres, but accumulation of H+ in muscle fibres can slow glycolysis and interfere with force generation, while in the extracellular fluid it is thought to contribute, at extremes, to the stimulation of pain receptors. The raised [H+] in the blood acts as an additional stimulus to ventilation, but it impairs fat oxidation by reducing release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue. See also anaerobic exercise, metabolic and related thresholds, monocarboxylate transporters.

lactate

1. any salt of lactic acid or the anion of lactic acid.
2. to secrete milk.

lactate dehydrogenase
called also LD, LDH; see lactate dehydrogenase.
lactate dehydrogenase test
a high level in milk used as an indicator of the presence of mastitis in the quarter.
exercise blood lactate
exercise by a horse begins aerobically without any elevation of blood lactate levels; exercise at faster levels is eventually performed anaerobically and blood lactate levels rise steeply.
lactate shuttle
the production of lactate in resting muscle where adequate oxygenation is available; represents a mechanism for conserving glucose absorbed from the gut by allowing it to be converted to lactate by skeletal muscle and later used for work or transferred to the liver for glycogen synthesis.
lactate Tm
maximal tubular concentration of lactate.