exempt


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exempt

(ĕg-zĕmpt′, ĭg-) [L. eximere, to take out, release, free]
Free from oversight or supervision by any regulation or authority.
References in periodicals archive ?
The salary level for exempt employees has been raised to $455, compared to $155 under the old rules.
You could run into a hard-nosed examiner who could hold that reporters are not exempt, especially in cases that involve a lot of 10:00 p.
In particular, investors may be willing to acquire equity interests in a FIE (as such interests may well be exempt from the FIE Rules, such as under the Open Market Exemption), whereas many investors will not be willing to acquire an interest in a PFIC.
However, if the product being marketed is the exempt organization itself, the proceeds will be taxable even without performing personal services.
When David Vienna, a lobbyist for the exempt workers and retirees, confronted White House officials about the plan in January 1999, they offered two justifications.
Such a move also would exempt vehicles that are not necessarily classic, allowing so-called dirty vehicles to stay on the road, Reynolds said.
The better run not-for-profits would continue to maintain their exempt status, and those that aren't as careful as they should be might face these intermediate sanctions.
Normally, independent investors have difficulty acquiring individual double tax exempt Iowa municipal bonds," says Voyageur President John G.
Everything you need to know in 60 minutes to identify exempt versus non-exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act so that you can properly determine which of your employees are entitled to be paid at least the current federal minimum wage rate for the first 40 hours worked in a workweek and an overtime rate of at least time and one-half their regular rate of pay
6049(b)(2)(B) provided that payments of exempt interest were exempt from information reporting and, thus, backup withholding.
Dealing with this risk means employers must analyze and satisfy two basic tests to determine whether or not an employee is exempt.
A similar spirit has informed the early efforts of the Internal Revenue Service's Tax Exempt Bond (TEB) Group in its choice of which bonds to audit.