kernel

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ker·nel

(ker'nĕl),
The central portion of the software expression of a mathematical algorithm, as in computed tomography.
[O.E. cyrnel, a little corn]

kernel

whole grains and the meats of nuts and stone fruit pips or pits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Too many executive incentive plans depend on the same few common measures of corporate success such as earnings per share (EPS) or earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA).
A study by Ashridge Business School in Great Britain for the International University Consortium for Executive Education revealed only a small minority of organizations regularly evaluate programs beyond obtaining participant reactions; only 11% evaluate executive education at the organizational level and only 3% regularly assess ROI.
The wisdom of this advice is supported by findings in the Hospital CEO Leadership Survey, which was conducted jointly by Cejka Search and Solucient[R] to gain insights into executive leadership characteristics.
An executive intelligence assessment cannot evaluate all of an individual's capabilities.
When it comes to executive education, Latin American companies today are thinking more about growth and innovation than cost control, says Bandarkar of Stanford University.
The executive regards the option as sold or otherwise disposed of in an arm's-length transaction for Regs.
The representatives of disciplines shall be nominated by the Executive Board and elected for three years by vote of the individual members of the Society.
When contemplating an executive presentation, information professionals should move from what might be fear and loathing of making presentations to consider factors beyond the purpose and content of the presentation.
Lusardi has been named chief executive for financial products and services.
It's a short course that doesn't take a lot of time to play,'' the National Golf Foundation's Judy Thompson said of an executive layout.
Often, that executive focuses on combining supply and demand roles in a business unit, and is responsible for managing and shaping expectations as well as delivering specific business-unit-level services.
Without an ability to communicate and communicate well, the tax executive is limited in his or her ability to answer the question and, therefore, effectively to serve his or her clients (including those to whom the tax executive directly reports and the company's operating groups).