excursion

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excursion

 [ek-skur´zhun]
a range of movement regularly repeated in performance of a function, e.g., excursion of the jaws in mastication. adj., adj excur´sive.
lateral excursion sideward movement of the mandible between the position of closure and the position in which cusps of opposing teeth are in vertical proximity.

ex·cur·sion

(eks-kŭr'zhŭn),
Any movement from one point to another, usually with the implied idea of returning again to the original position.

excursion

/ex·cur·sion/ (eks-kur´zhun) a range of movement regularly repeated in performance of a function, e.g., excursion of the jaws in mastication.excur´sive

excursion

[ikskur′zhən]
Etymology: L, ex, out, currere, to run
a departure or deviation from a direct or normal course.

ex·cur·sion

(eks-kŭr'zhŭn)
Any movement from one point to another, usually with the implied idea of returning again to the original position.

excursion

a range of movement regularly repeated in performance of a function, e.g. excursion of the jaws in mastication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cook's Excursionist and Tourist Advertiser (2 August 1864): 2.
For local whites, the throngs of fashionably dressed and urbane excursionists and vacationers who came to pay their respects to Brown and his co- conspirators not only undermined the nation's steps toward sectional reconciliation and its attendant villainization of abolitionists, but moreover constituted a flagrant rebuke of the rituals of deference that had long marked the public performance of race.
Many excursionists are compelled to wait for long periods at Stokesley as the majority of the bus services run only at long intervals.
For all excursionists there was free ferriage, a very handsome contribution on the part of Mr.
This sadness obliges you, in spite of yourself, to meditate and, when other excursionists are present, you hesitate to speak, even to communicate your impressions and thoughts to your companions.
However, the number of cruise ship passengers and excursionists rose by 49.
In 1916 the excursionists ventured as far as Narara and Windsor.
A traveler on a Great Lakes ship in 1855 wrote in regard to a stop at Detroit: "We have a large accession of excursionists at this point; indeed, our number is more than doubled.
AYUBIA -- The tourist hill spot of Ayubia, perched at a height of about 8,000 feet and a virtual paradise for summer-weary excursionists in particular, has temporarily closed its Jewel in the Crown attraction.
Extending the work of Stephen Gill, this chapter does an admirable job of locating Wordsworth's late work in its Victorian context, aligning his fear of working-class excursionists with the "rational recreation movement" and its efforts to "impose middle-class norms and values onto the laboring classes and their recreation" (125).
Tangoing the Night Away: Excursionists with Abercrombie & Kent can learn the national dance in Buenos Aires after touring Iguazu Falls.
The Aberavon disaster - boatmen charged with manslaughter BAssizes with the case arising out of the Aberavon boating disaster in August last, when over a score of excursionists met with sudden death in consequence of the capsizing of a pleasure boat, manned by two brothers named William and John Bath.