excretion

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excretion

 [ek-skre´shun]
1. the act, process, or function of excreting. Ordinarily, what is meant by excretion is defecation, the evacuation of feces. Technically, excretion can refer to the expulsion of any matter, whether from a single cell or from the entire body, or to the matter excreted.
2. waste material eliminated from the body, including feces, urine, and sweat. Mucus and carbon dioxide also can be considered excretions. The organs of excretion are the intestinal tract, kidneys, lungs, and skin. Called also excreta. adj., adj ex´cretory.

ex·cre·tion

(eks-krē'shŭn),
1. The process whereby the undigested residue of food and the waste products of metabolism are eliminated, material is removed to regulate the composition of body fluids and tissues, or substances are expelled to perform functions on an exterior surface.
2. The product of a tissue or organ that is material to be passed out of the body. Synonym(s): excreta Compare: secretion.
[see excrement]

excretion

/ex·cre·tion/ (eks-kre´shun)
1. the act, process, or function of excreting.
2. material that is excreted.ex´cretory

excretion

(ĭk-skrē′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of discharging waste matter from the blood, tissues, or organs.
2. The matter, such as urine or sweat, that is so excreted.

excretion

[ekskrē′shən]
the process of eliminating, shedding, or getting rid of substances by body organs or tissues, as part of a natural metabolic activity. Excretion usually begins at the cellular level, where water, carbon dioxide, and other waste products of cellular life are emptied into the capillaries. The epidermis excretes dead skin cells by shedding them daily.

excretion

The act or process of eliminating waste products from the body.

excretion

Therapeutics
1. The final elimination of a drug or other compound from the circulation–eg, via the kidneys in urine, biles into stool, saliva, sweat.
2. A product that has been eliminated.

ex·cre·tion

(eks-krē'shŭn)
1. The process whereby the undigested residue of food and the waste products of metabolism are eliminated; material is removed to regulate the composition of body fluids and tissues, or substances are expelled to perform functions on an exterior surface.
2. The product of a tissue or organ that is material to be passed out of the body.
Synonym(s): excreta.
See: excrement
Compare: secretion

excretion

Removal from the body of the waste products of metabolism.

excretion

any elimination from an organism of unwanted materials, for example, carbon dioxide and nitrogenous substances produced in METABOLISM. It is worth noting that excretory materials must be produced by the organism rather than just pass through it; thus faeces in mammals contain a mixture of excreta (e.g. bile pigments) and undigested gut contents. Compare SECRETION.

excretion

1. the act, process or function of excreting.
2. material that is excreted.
Ordinarily, what is meant by excretion is the evacuation of feces. Technically, excretion can refer to the expulsion of any matter, whether from a single cell or from the entire body, or to the matter excreted.

virus excretion

Patient discussion about excretion

Q. what is the best thing to do to eliminate or to let it be remove without surgery?I'm afraid but laser mayb ok If I can go for laser where can you suggest coz I'm jobless and can't afford to pay.Or is there some remedy that i can take to melt those stones inside my bladder then they can come out through my waste ?

A. Bladder stones, also called bladder calculi, often form when concentrated urine sits in your bladder. Bladder stones usually need to be removed. If the stone is small, your doctor may recommend that you drink an increased amount of water each day to help the stone pass. If the stone is large or doesn't pass on its own, your doctor may need to remove the stone. Bladder stones are usually removed during a procedure called a cystolitholapaxy. This is done by inserting a small tube with a camera at the end (cystoscope) through your urethra and into your bladder to view the stone. Your doctor uses a laser, ultrasound or mechanical device to break the stone into small pieces and then flushes the pieces from your bladder.
I am not familiar with the cost of such procedure.

Q. skins does excrete oil and keratin what exactly is the whitish cape up that you can squeeze out from underskin

A. It sounds like you refer to sebum, an oily substance secreted by (how surprising :) ) sebaceus glands attached to the hair root. It's important for the skin, although abnormal secretion of it may cause diseases such as acne.

You may read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebum#Sebum

Q. How much influence does diet pose when dealing with fibro? What actions have been found to reduce or eliminate

A. Of course, you may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/fibromyalgia.html

And if you have any questions you may consult your doctor.

More discussions about excretion
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Iodine in 24-Hour Collections Pre and Post 50 mg lodine/lodide Consumption with Percent Excretion 24-Hour Collection #1 Patient Patient Patient Palieri Pat.
We then evaluated differences in serial 24-hour BJP excretion (mg/d) by each method.
We observed instant elevations in salt and water excretions after renal denervation in SHR which are in agreement with our earlier reports on sodium and water regulation following removal of renal sympathetic tone in hypertensive animals (5,13).
Furthermore, the experimental data are used to test equations, developed under Danish conditions for assessing fecal production and N excretion from pigs produced under typical Vietnamese conditions.
During large excretions in which the spiders voided many drops, they released most of these drops in a nearly constant stream, so that my counts of these drops were approximate.
Black participants had lower potassium excretion levels than whites, leading to a much higher sodium to potassium ratio of 3.
uric acid and creatinine urinary excretions (Table 3), remained unchanged during the 3 h of observation.
Total urinary excretion of iodine was low, from 81 to 331 mcg/24 hours, with the exception of one at 849.
Although the excretion of cross-links in urine varies by condition, the nadir/peak ratio seems to be reasonably consistent (24, 27).
In the last couple of decades, evidence of renal tubular damage, based on increased excretion of low molecular weight (LMW) proteins, has been reported in association with lower levels of Cd exposure in the general population [Akesson et al.
On-farm nutrient intake estimates can be coupled with estimates of nutrient content in food products leaving the farm to estimate total nutrient excretions in feces and urine.