excoriate


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ex·co·ri·ate

(eks-kō'rē-āt),
To scratch or otherwise strip off the skin by physical means.

excoriate

(ĭk-skôr′ē-āt′)
tr.v. excori·ated, excori·ating, excori·ates
1.
a. To censure strongly; denounce: "preparing to excoriate him for his insufficient preparations" (Neil Bascomb).
b. To criticize (something) harshly: "After excoriating the vapid culture of movie-star worship ... he's ended up at that trough" (Maureen Dowd).
2. To tear, scrape, or wear off (the skin).

ex·co′ri·a′tion n.
ex·co′ri·a′tor n.

ex·co·ri·ate

(eks-kōr'ē-āt)
To scratch or otherwise denude the skin by physical means.
References in periodicals archive ?
He vigorously excoriates judicial activists and their apologists in his latest book, The Most Dangerous Branch: How the Supreme Court of Canada Has Undermined Our Law and Our Democracy.
What Sartwell does in this passage--besides bludgeoning the reader with epistemic--is what he excoriates other white commentators for; i.
Dean launched his campaign with his foresighted and outspoken criticism of the war, and he still scores heavily when he excoriates Gephardt and Kerry for taking the Democratic Party along for the war ride.
If you're looking for a book that excoriates liberals and Democrats, Ann Coulter's Treason: Liberal Treachery From the Cold War to the War on Terrorism will do the trick.
McNay, quite rightly, has every sympathy with the Irish position, and excoriates Acheson for dismissing it out of hand.
Galbraith excoriates "a stale religion of the virtues of saving, of thrift, of accumulation--a kind of reborn Victorianism for the masses" that makes personal savings and federal deficit reductions proof of Calvinist election.
He seems reluctant to preach what he himself practices, perhaps because he so badly wants to avoid the role of the stuffed shirt who excoriates ordinary people for their insufficiencies.
Gelbspan excoriates the mainstream press for continuing to quote greenhouse skeptics S.