excoriate


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ex·co·ri·ate

(eks-kō'rē-āt),
To scratch or otherwise strip off the skin by physical means.

excoriate

(ĭk-skôr′ē-āt′)
tr.v. excori·ated, excori·ating, excori·ates
1.
a. To censure strongly; denounce: "preparing to excoriate him for his insufficient preparations" (Neil Bascomb).
b. To criticize (something) harshly: "After excoriating the vapid culture of movie-star worship ... he's ended up at that trough" (Maureen Dowd).
2. To tear, scrape, or wear off (the skin).

ex·co′ri·a′tion n.
ex·co′ri·a′tor n.

ex·co·ri·ate

(eks-kōr'ē-āt)
To scratch or otherwise denude the skin by physical means.
References in periodicals archive ?
This point is obvious to conservatives, but it is rare thinking on the left, and Berman excoriates leftist apologists for terror, such as Noam Chomsky.
The first writer, Declan Murphy, excoriates the opinions of the Channel 4 racing team, in particular that well-known defender of the punters' interest, John McCririck.
While he excoriates corporate boards for too often failing to adequately exercise their responsibilities of managerial oversight, he blames owners--institutional investors in particular--for not insisting "that managers operate not in their own interest, but in the interest of the owners.
In this issue, Nat Hentoff excoriates ACLU head Anthony Romero for at first defending the signing of a document saying he would not knowingly hire someone who is on the government's watch list of people who are supporters of terrorism.
Radio host Amy Goodman's Exception to the Rulers excoriates Bush, but mentions the environment only in the context of oil-company pollution in Nigeria.
The report excoriates the ANC for human rights abuses, particularly at its training camps.
He vigorously excoriates judicial activists and their apologists in his latest book, The Most Dangerous Branch: How the Supreme Court of Canada Has Undermined Our Law and Our Democracy.
He refuses invitations to exhibit; excoriates and threatens the press, museums, and universities; retreats to a remote hideout; and insists on writing his own catalogues and curating his own shows.
What Sartwell does in this passage--besides bludgeoning the reader with epistemic--is what he excoriates other white commentators for; i.