exclusion

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Related to exclusionary: Exclusionary Clause

exclusion

 [ek-skloo´zhun]
a shutting out or elimination; surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

ex·clu·sion

(eks-klū'zhŭn),
A shutting out; disconnection from the main portion.
[L. ex- cludo, pp. -clusus, to shut out]

exclusion

/ex·clu·sion/ (eks-kloo´zhun)
1. a shutting out or elimination.
2. surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

exclusion

Health insurance
A specific condition or circumstance for which the insurance policy will not provide benefits. 

Managed care
An item or service that Medicare or another healthcare payer does not cover—e.g., most prescription drugs, long-term care, custodial care in a nursing or private home.
 
Medspeak-UK
Exclusion from work; gardening leave. The removal of a person (generally understood to mean a health professional) from an NHS workplace when restriction is regarded as an insufficient measure, and justified where:
• There has been a critical incident where serious allegations have been made; or
• There has been a breakdown in relationships between a colleague and the rest of the team; or
• The presence of the practitioner is likely to hinder the formal investigation.

Key factors in exclusion:
• Protection of staff or patient interests; or
• To assist the investigative process.

The term is used by the National Clinical Assessment Authority in the UK, and is loosely equivalent to suspension; it is a manoeuvre reserved for only the most exceptional circumstances.

Social medicine
The deliberate shutting out of a person from a group to which he/she is entitled to belong or in whose activities he/she has the right to participate.
 
Vox populi
The removal of a thing; the taking of a thing “out of action”.

Amsterdam criteria

Oncology Criteria for diagnosing hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, see there.
Amsterdam criteria
Family history
Presence of histologically verified colorectal cancer in ≥ 3 relatives–one of whom is a 1st-degree relative of the other 2
'Vertical' history
Presence of disease in ≥ 2 successive generations
Age of onset
Age < 50 in > 1 affected relative
Exclusion
Hereditary polyposis syndromes have been excluded

ex·clu·sion

(eks-klū'zhŭn)
A shutting out; disconnection from the main portion.
[L. ex-cludo, pp. -clusus, to shut out]

exclusion

a shutting out or elimination; surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

competitive exclusion (CE)
a term used to describe the protective effect of the natural or native bacterial flora of the intestine in limiting the colonization of some bacterial pathogens. Competitive exclusion products are also called probiotics, direct-fed microbials or CE cultures.
exclusion principle
it is possible to prove from a parentage test that a particular animal is not the true parent but it is impossible to prove that a particular animal is a parent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though this article deals with legislative intent in Canadian courts, we have to begin our Cinderella story with the emergence of the exclusionary rule in England wherein our judicial system has its roots.
The exclusionary rule was born out of an age in England known to some as the "Battle of the Booksellers.
focus of exclusionary zoning on the content of local ordinances, instead
Part III discusses major components of the Court's exclusionary rule jurisprudence including the good faith exception, the cause requirement, and the standing requirement, and offers three principal reasons why this hybrid approach is novel and more powerful than prior attempts to theorize the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule.
The study also suggested these students were more likely to enter the juvenile justice system than students who did not experience exclusionary discipline.
Exclusionary Empire was not written for those with a general interest in history, yet at the same time it does not offer very much that is new to the specialist in the field.
21) While Mapp drastically expanded the reach of the exclusionary rule, twenty years later the membership of the Supreme Court had changed, and once again, so had the philosophy of the majority.
However, most distribution and franchise agreements contain provisions which on their face would amount to Exclusionary Provisions if the franchisor and franchisee, or manufacturer and dealer, were competitors.
19) Put in such bold terms, it is made to appear that this cost-benefit balancing process is a routine part of the assessment as to when the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule should be applied, but nothing could be further from the truth.
This is why the Supreme Court held in Matsushita, (17) the TV case, that a low-price-now strategy by Japanese producers could not be condemned as exclusionary.
There remains no firm evidence, one way or the other, that exclusionary rules actually deter law enforcement officers from conducting unreasonable searches.
15) In June 2005, the United States Supreme Court granted certiorari to address the question of whether the exclusionary rule applies to violations of the knock and announce rule.