exclusion

(redirected from exclusionary)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.
Related to exclusionary: Exclusionary Clause

exclusion

 [ek-skloo´zhun]
a shutting out or elimination; surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

ex·clu·sion

(eks-klū'zhŭn),
A shutting out; disconnection from the main portion.
[L. ex- cludo, pp. -clusus, to shut out]

exclusion

/ex·clu·sion/ (eks-kloo´zhun)
1. a shutting out or elimination.
2. surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

exclusion

Health insurance
A specific condition or circumstance for which the insurance policy will not provide benefits. 

Managed care
An item or service that Medicare or another healthcare payer does not cover—e.g., most prescription drugs, long-term care, custodial care in a nursing or private home.
 
Medspeak-UK
Exclusion from work; gardening leave. The removal of a person (generally understood to mean a health professional) from an NHS workplace when restriction is regarded as an insufficient measure, and justified where:
• There has been a critical incident where serious allegations have been made; or
• There has been a breakdown in relationships between a colleague and the rest of the team; or
• The presence of the practitioner is likely to hinder the formal investigation.

Key factors in exclusion:
• Protection of staff or patient interests; or
• To assist the investigative process.

The term is used by the National Clinical Assessment Authority in the UK, and is loosely equivalent to suspension; it is a manoeuvre reserved for only the most exceptional circumstances.

Social medicine
The deliberate shutting out of a person from a group to which he/she is entitled to belong or in whose activities he/she has the right to participate.
 
Vox populi
The removal of a thing; the taking of a thing “out of action”.

Amsterdam criteria

Oncology Criteria for diagnosing hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, see there.
Amsterdam criteria
Family history
Presence of histologically verified colorectal cancer in ≥ 3 relatives–one of whom is a 1st-degree relative of the other 2
'Vertical' history
Presence of disease in ≥ 2 successive generations
Age of onset
Age < 50 in > 1 affected relative
Exclusion
Hereditary polyposis syndromes have been excluded

ex·clu·sion

(eks-klū'zhŭn)
A shutting out; disconnection from the main portion.
[L. ex-cludo, pp. -clusus, to shut out]

exclusion

a shutting out or elimination; surgical isolation of a part, as of a segment of intestine, without removal from the body.

competitive exclusion (CE)
a term used to describe the protective effect of the natural or native bacterial flora of the intestine in limiting the colonization of some bacterial pathogens. Competitive exclusion products are also called probiotics, direct-fed microbials or CE cultures.
exclusion principle
it is possible to prove from a parentage test that a particular animal is not the true parent but it is impossible to prove that a particular animal is a parent.
References in periodicals archive ?
odds with the reasons the exclusionary rule was created.
commonly identified goals of state exclusionary rules: deterring police
38) Specifically, Herring held that the exclusionary rule does not apply when an illegal search is based on "isolated [police] negligence attenuated from the arrest.
44) As a result, good faith now resembles other limitations on the exclusionary rule that rest on the causal link between the original source of the error and the proposed use of the evidence.
That single and simple statement became the foundation for the exclusionary rule, profoundly influencing statutory interpretation for two centuries.
Why was the exclusionary rule upheld for so many years after official and reliable records of the debates were being published?
Unlike exclusionary discipline, where a student experiences a punitive measure as a consequence of misbehavior, restorative justice challenges students to hold each other accountable and right a wrong.
Concerned about the rising use of exclusionary discipline as well as bullying, Ed White Middle School in San Antonio, Texas, introduced the restorative justice model during the 2012-13 academic year.
41) Permitting reasonable mistakes of law may diminish the deterrence that the exclusionary rule would otherwise have on police misunderstanding or uncertainty towards the law, potentially encouraging police ignorance or creative interpretation of the law.
43) The majority could have relied on the recently adopted North Carolina statutory good-faith exception to fully maintain the integrity of the exclusionary rule instead of adopting an additional analogous exception.
of on these broader exclusionary dynamics, has defined the problem of
In Part I we describe traditional accounts of exclusionary zoning.