exchange

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exchange

 [eks-chānj´]
1. the substitution of one thing for another.
2. to substitute one thing for another.
gas exchange the passage of oxygen and carbon dioxide in opposite directions across the alveolocapillary membrane.
health care information exchange in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as providing patient care information to health professionals in other agencies.
impaired gas exchange a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as excess or deficit in oxygenation and/or carbon dioxide elimination at the alveolocapillary membrane (see gas exchange). Etiological and contributing factors include an altered oxygen supply, changes in the alveolar-capillary membrane, altered blood flow, and altered oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Defining characteristics include changes in mental status such as confusion, somnolence, restlessness, and irritability; ineffective coughing and inability to move secretions from the air passages; hypercapnia; and hypoxia. For specific medical treatments and nursing interventions, see airway clearance, ineffective; breathing patterns, ineffective; chronic airflow limitation; and anemia.
plasma exchange see plasma exchange.

ex·change

(eks-chānj'),
To substitute one thing for another, or the act of such substitution.

exchange

/ex·change/ (eks-chānj)
1. the substitution of one thing for another.
2. to substitute one thing for another.

plasma exchange  the removal of plasma from withdrawn blood, with retransfusion of the formed elements into the donor; done for removal of circulating antibodies or abnormal plasma constituents. The plasma removed is replaced by type-specific frozen plasma or by albumin.

ex·change

(eks-chānj')
To substitute one thing for another, or the act of such substitution.
References in classic literature ?
There were communication exchanges before the invention of the telephone.
To describe one of those early telephone exchanges in the silence of a printed page is a wholly impossible thing.
What with whittling the switchboards, swearing at subscribers, playing tricks with the wires, and roaring on all occasions like young bulls of Bashan, the boys in the first exchanges did their full share in adding to the troubles of the business.
If ever the rush of women into the business world was an unmixed blessing, it was when the boys of the telephone exchanges were superseded by girls.
Three years earlier he had timidly asked for a job as operator in the Boston exchange, at five dollars a week, and had shown such an aptitude for the work that he was soon made one of the captains.
So, when he became an operator in the Boston telephone exchange, a year later, he had already developed to a remarkable degree his natural genius for telephony.
There was no source of information and each exchange did the best it could.
Suppose now that a husbandman, or an artisan, brings some production to market, and he comes at a time when there is no one to exchange with him,--is he to leave his calling and sit idle in the market-place?
In well-ordered States they are commonly those who are the weakest in bodily strength, and therefore of little use for any other purpose; their duty is to be in the market, and to give money in exchange for goods to those who desire to sell and to take money from those who desire to buy.
We see then: the means of production and of exchange, on whose foundation the bourgeoisie built itself up, were generated in feudal society.
Modern bourgeois society with its relations of production, of exchange and of property, a society that has conjured up such gigantic means of production and of exchange, is like the sorcerer, who is no longer able to control the powers of the nether world whom he has called up by his spells.
He wished with all his heart that he had never been such a fool as to dabble on the Stock Exchange, but the only thing was to hold on; something decisive might happen any day and the shares would go up; he did not hope now for a profit, but he wanted to make good his loss.