salivation

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salivation

 [sal″ĭ-va´shun]
1. the secretion of saliva.

sal·i·va·tion

(sal'i-vā'shŭn),
Production of saliva. See: sialorrhea.

salivation

/sal·i·va·tion/ (sal″ĭ-va´shun)
1. the secretion of saliva.

salivation

[sal′ivā′shən]
the process of saliva secretion by the salivary glands.

si·a·lism

, sialismus (sī'ă-lizm, -liz'mŭs)
An excess secretion of saliva.
Synonym(s): ptyalism, salivation, sialorrhea, sialosis.
[G. sialismos]

salivation

The production of saliva. Excessive salivation is a feature of mouth ulcers and other causes of mouth irritation, PARKINSON'S DISEASE, nerve gas poisoning, organophosphorus insecticide poisoning, mercury poisoning, RABIES and overactivity of the parasympathetic nervous system.

salivation (sal´ivā´shən),

n the production of saliva.

salivation

1. the secretion of saliva.
2. ptyalism.

excessive salivation
may be caused by slaframine toxicosis from the fungus Rhizoctonia leguminocola, by foreign bodies or painful lesions in the mouth. To be distinguished from drooling of saliva because of failure to swallow.
salivation inhibitor
antisialagogue; examples are atropine and glycopyrrolate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides dissociative side effects, which can be considered therapeutic in the setting of pain or psychotherapy the drug can cause spasms, twitches, nystagmus, numbness, sweating, excessive salivation, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, hoarseness, and slurred speech.
According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, chlorpyrifos exposure symptoms include headache, blurred vision, excessive salivation, muscle weakness, and sudden change in heart rate.
Roberts will be responsible for managing the development and commercialization of the company's development projects including the migraine drug HPC-001 and a line extension of its Robinul(R)product for the treatment of excessive salivation.
Visible characteristics of the disease in sheep include a fever, changes in mucous lining the animal's mouth, nose and eyes, and excessive salivation and frothing.
The animal exhibited clinical signs of neurologic involvement including ataxia, shaking, a drooping lower lip, excessive salivation, decreased responsiveness to surroundings, and nystagmus.
Symptoms include destructive behavior, excessive salivation, and inappropriate urination or defecation.
Signs of the disease include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and urination, and abnormal behavior such as stumbling, trembling and depression.
Signs progress to severe emaciation, extreme behavioral changes, excessive salivation, tremors, and mild ataxia (1,2).
Clinical signs include fever and blister-like lesions, excessive salivation, lameness and decreased feed consumption.
Severe envenomation, more common in small children, may involve loss of muscle control, roving or abnormal eye movements, slurred speech, respiratory distress, excessive salivation, frothing at the mouth and vomiting.
Side effects observed include excessive salivation, vomiting and muscle tremors.