excess mortality

excess mortality

[ikses′]
Etymology: L, excedere, to go out, mortalis, mortal
a premature death, or one that occurs before the average life expectancy for a person of a particular demographic category.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report also shows that from weeks 50, 2017 to week 4 of 2018, statistically significant excess mortality from all causes was observed in over-65s in England.
WHO says high-quality maternal health care is essential for reducing excess mortality.
Decreases in excess mortality were detected for all ages both during dialysis treatment and time with a functioning kidney transplant.
The causes of excess mortality in the treatment-resistant depression group were quite different in the younger and older patients.
The supplies were deployed along with Medical Mobile Team (MMT) to support other health partners in management of common illnesses to reduce excess mortality and morbidity and build the capacity of partners in early case detection of outbreak prone diseases.
Excess mortality risk at 12 months was higher in males than in females, and in the 65-74-year age group compared to older age groups.
To derive their estimates, the researchers calculated the occurrence of diabetes in the population and the excess mortality risk among people with diabetes over a five-year follow-up period.
Once HDP women passed the age of 50, their excess mortality risk was substantially muted, even in women with recurrent HDP.
Dr Annie Campbell, of health analysis and life events at the Office for National Statistics (ONS), which produced the figures, said: "One of the key factors behind the lower excess mortality this winter was a fall in the number of deaths among the elderly.
Persons with epilepsy are at risk of excess mortality in part because of comorbidity (4).
Also, in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy study (6), excess mortality was only observed in individuals with chronic kidney disease in type 1 DM patients with diabetes duration of over 20 years.
Competing mortality from HIV-associated infections seemed to contribute minimally to the excess risk of death; rather, earlier oncologic progression among women with HIV seemed to account for the excess mortality," they wrote (J Clin Oncol.