exception


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ex·cep·tion

(ek-sep'shŭn)
That which is omitted, excluded, or set apart.
[L. excipio, to exclude]
References in classic literature ?
I am very, very grateful to you, mon cher," or "ma chere"- he called everyone without exception and without the slightest variation in his tone, "my dear," whether they were above or below him in rank- "I thank you for myself and for our two dear ones whose name day we are keeping.
Of land-birds I obtained twenty-six kinds, all peculiar to the group and found nowhere else, with the exception of one lark-like finch from North America (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), which ranges on that continent as far north as 54 degs.
If, then, a man should make this exception and contend that statements and opinions are capable of admitting contrary qualities, his contention is unsound.
But even to this rule an exception will occur now and then in the lapse of centuries, and my friend Adam was one.
Look back at the description: 'Hair cut rather short, clean shaven, with the exception of narrow half-whiskers.
All the officers agreed, with the one exception of Wardour, who still kept silence.
To provide for amendments to be ratified by three fourths of the States under two exceptions only.
The interval, with the exception of the last few months, has been chiefly spent by the author tossing about on the wide ocean.
The one exception was a sturdy white-headed boy, standing apart from all the rest on a stool in a corner--a forlorn little Crusoe, isolated in his own desert island of solitary penal disgrace.
The strongest apparent exception to this latter rule, is that of the so-called 'colonies' of M.
Therefore you might perfectly have made the claim for him if you had not, as it happened, seen an exception to take.
With few exceptions, I found that the crops were mortgaged in the counties where I went, and that the most of the coloured farmers were in debt.