ex situ conservation


Also found in: Wikipedia.

ex situ conservation

A term defined by the Convention on Biological Diversity (1993) as the conservation of components of biological diversity outside their natural habitats.
References in periodicals archive ?
The techniques that have been developed for captive populations in zoos, aquaria, and botanic gardens will increasingly be employed in the wild, where fragmented and isolated populations will mirror the scenario of ex situ conservation.
Project Description: Ex situ conservation and commercial scale cultivation of indigenous yam varieties by Community Development Centre.
In addition to spore banking, gametophytes and sporophytes also offer opportunities for ex situ conservation by in vitro cultures (Chao et al.
Germplasm was collected for ex situ conservation initiatives and for the possibility of future reintroductions.
Ex situ conservation provides an important protection against the loss of plant genetic resources, playing a key role for the programs of rare plant preservation.
Some of these are undertaken directly at the places where the plants are found, while others are less 'direct', such as those relating to commercial systems, ex situ conservation and bio-prospecting.
We have spent 50 years on ex situ conservation, and we are committed to developing a sustainable relationship between humans and the giant panda," said Dr.
2009) suggested that in vitro preserved material could be used as ex situ conservation source, and the effective propagation and medium-term conservation methods developed in the present study could be used as the basis for development of long-term conservation of R.
The in situ approach emerged as ex situ conservation was found to be inappropriate for crops (such as the potato) that are vegetatively propagated, and whose seed does not breed "true.
All of the results will facilitate design of the optimal artificial insemination strategy and help to achieve the ultimate aim of ex situ conservation.
In situ and ex situ conservation efforts should proceed in combination to ensure that the habitat suitable for reintroduction has protection when the propagated plants are ready for reintroduction.
Countless scientists have left behind the squabbles that pitted in situ conservation proponents against ex situ conservation proponents.