evolution

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evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.

ev·o·lu·tion

(ev'ō-lū'shŭn),
1. A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
2. A progressive distancing between the genotype and the phenotype in a line of descent.
3. The liberation of a gas or heat in the course of a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
[L. e-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll out]

evolution

/evo·lu·tion/ (ev″ah-loo´shun) a developmental process in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution  the appearance of similar forms and/or functions in two or more lines not sufficiently related phylogenetically to account for the similarity.
organic evolution  the origin and development of species; the theory that existing organisms are the result of descent with modification from those of past times.

evolution

(ĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, ē′və-)
n.
1. A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
2. Change in the genetic composition of a population during successive generations, often resulting in the development of new species. The mechanisms of evolution include natural selection acting on the genetic variation among individuals, mutation, migration, and genetic drift.

evolution

[ev′əlo̅o̅′shən]
Etymology: L, evolvere, to roll forth
1 a gradual, orderly, and continuous process of change and development from one condition or state to another. It encompasses all aspects of life, including physical, psychological, sociological, cultural, and intellectual development, and involves a progressive advancement from a simple to a more complex form or state through the processes of modification, differentiation, and growth.
2 a change in the genetic composition of a population of organisms over time.
3 the appearance over long periods of time of new taxonomic groups of organisms from preexisting groups. Kinds of evolution are convergent evolution, determinant evolution, emergent evolution, organic evolution, orthogenic evolution, and saltatory evolution. evolutionist, n.

ev·o·lu·tion

(ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. A continuing process of change from one state, condition, or form to another.
2. A progressive distancing between the genotype and the phenotype in a line of descent.
[L. e-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll out]

evolution

The theory that all living organisms have developed in complexity, from a simple life form. Evolution occurs by the natural selection of those who, by the fortune of spontaneous random changes (mutations), happen to be best suited to their contemporary environment, to survive and reproduce. It does not occur by the passing on to offspring of characteristics acquired during the lifetime of an individual. Characteristics are passed on by the transmission of DNA from parents to offspring and, unless mutation has occurred, this DNA is an identical copy of the DNA of preceding generations.

evolution

an explanation of the way in which present-day organisms have been produced, involving changes taking place in the genetic make-up of populations that have been passed on to successive generations. According to DARWINISM, evolutionary MUTATIONS have given rise to changes that have, through NATURAL SELECTION, either survived in better adapted organisms (see ADAPTATION, GENETIC), or died out. Evolution is now generally accepted as the means which gives rise to new species (as opposed to SPECIAL CREATION) but there is still debate about exactly how it has taken place and how rapidly changes can take place. See LAMARCKISM.

evolution

the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.

convergent evolution
the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environment.
divergent evolution
the development of different characteristics in animals that were closely related in response to being placed in different environments.

Patient discussion about evolution

Q. How the bacterias are produced?

A. The Bacteria are a large group of unicellular microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a wide range of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. (The name comes from the Greek bakterion, meaning small staff.) Bacteria are ubiquitous in every habitat on Earth, growing in soil, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste,[2] water, and deep in the Earth's crust, as well as in organic matter and the live bodies of plants and animals. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water; in all, there are approximately five nonillion (5×1030) bacteria on Earth,[3] forming much of the world's biomass.[4] Bacteria are vital in recycling nutrients, with many important steps in nutrient cycles depending on these organisms, such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere and putrefaction. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacteria Hope this helps.

More discussions about evolution
References in periodicals archive ?
A first conclusion is that the immune-inspired is a more robust approach for behaviors coordination than the evolutive one (see also [12] and [13] for further arguments).
Thus, we were interested to elucidate the evolutive relationships among these proteins and the molecular mechanisms leading to the gain of a similar architecture.
Hybridizing GA with VNS or SA helps to improve the results, since the inner operator provides a new source of diversity in the evolutive search.
The evolutive trends of correlation between phenomena.
Delta Networks claimed the Evolutive WiMAX series from Wavesat Wireless offers a flexible, complete solution for a broad range of WiMAX applications, providing the performance and customisation needed in the market.
Si ces entretiens sont a geometrie variable, les questions posees s'adaptant au parcours de la personne rencontree et s'affinant, de facon evolutive, a mesure que progresse l'enquete, plusieurs questions se revelent incontournables, notamment en ce qui concerne la legitimite de la critique, l'authenticite de l'engagement de celui qui la fait, le risque encouru par l'acte de creer et par l'acte de repondre publiquement a cette creation.
Sauvage, 1UMR-CNRS 5558 "Biometrie et Biologie evolutive," Universite C.
For really specific targeting, pick a fig, says Martine Hossaert-McKey of Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive in Montpellier, France.
Dewey's influence (1916, 1924) regarding group learning renewal--revising Vigotzkii (1981) who considers education as a social process, and Piaget that studies the evolutive stages in people--points out the benefits of collaborative learning processes.
The Evolutive coffeemaker takes on a sleek and curvy futuristic look, while other products like the new rice cooker, a blender and steamer become the latest additions to the company's Inox collection featuring shining steel on black finishes.
La troisieme partie portant sur la competence traite principalement de technologie dans une perspective evolutive et historique en mettant l'accent sur le developpement des habiletes dans differents types de societes, premachinistes et modernes.
The purpose of this framework agreement is to migrate the grp lab application to a wysiwyg solution, the first-level support of the grp business model application as well as the corrective and evolutive maintenance of the platform and the application.