evolutionary psychology


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evolutionary psychology

n.
The branch of psychology in which aspects of brain structure, cognition, and behavior are interpreted as evolutionary adaptations to the physical or social environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) The literature on evolutionary psychology is vast, but two valuable collections are Barkow, Cosmides, and Tooby (1995) and Buss (2005).
Carroll sees poststructuralism and evolutionary psychology as irreconcilable, arguing in Literary Darwinism, for example, against any feminist interpretation of Austen because such a reading is colored by postmodern, radical bias.
Tooby and Cosmides (1992) have claimed modularity as a central tenet of evolutionary psychology, although some evolutionary psychologists have dissented from this view (e.
This change is not necessarily inconsistent with the evolutionary psychology model.
But the first thing that should be noted about Brown's list is its inclusiveness: We may in fact possess an innate tendency to divide the world into "in groups" and "out groups," but the first instinct of evolutionary psychology is to group us all together in the shared family of human universals.
In the end Malik's learned stance seems similar to many of the crudest and most ideological critics of evolutionary psychology.
I shall be giving an internal critique of evolutionary psychology.
WHILE THE THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS for modem evolutionary psychology were laid over 20 years ago, the theories are only now reaching the general press (Wright, 1994; Pinker, 1997; Nicholson, 1998).
There is another interpretation of the evolutionary psychology of cell phones, according to which the cell phone users are seeking not fellowship but isolation from the hordes of fellow humans around them.
Second, I briefly argue that there is no a priori reason why LMC should not be adequate for the general purposes of evolutionary psychology.
From these basic principles, at least some students of human nature, such as Robert Wright, in The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology, have argued for the evolutionary derivation of many current patterns of human behavior, such as spousal battering (pp.
Chapter 5: The evolutionary psychology of human beauty.

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