evocation


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e·vo·ca·tion

(ev'ō-kā'shŭn, ē-vō-kā'shŭn),
Induction of a particular tissue produced by the action of an evocator during embryogenesis.
[L. evoco, pp. evocatus, to call forth, evoke]

evocation

/evo·ca·tion/ (ev″ah-ka´shun) the calling forth of morphogenetic potentialities through contact with organizer material.

evocation

[ev′ōkā′shən]
Etymology: L, evocare, to call forth
a specific morphogenetic change within a developing embryo that results from the action of a single hormone or other chemical. See also induction.

e·vo·ca·tion

(ev'ō-kā'shŭn)
Induction of a particular tissue produced by the action of an evocator during embryogenesis.
[L. evoco, pp. evocatus, to call forth, evoke]

evocation

the induction of embryonic tissue by a chemical stimulus, for example, ECTODERM produces neutral material in the vertebrate embryo due to an evocator (see ORGANIZER REGION from the underlying CHORDAMESODERM.
References in periodicals archive ?
The evocation of the poet's childhood by the Ethiope River in Sapele is compelling.
The result is a richly-layered evocation of the employment relation (the "hire," as it is termed) that is both comprehensive and insightful.
This piece is an extraordinary evocation of a man and his spirit.
But even when ``Big Day'' threatens to stumble into coarse slapstick, the deftly funny cast strives to ensure that this is the best comic evocation of a worst-cast scenario.
The most successful aspect of the show was its evocation of the power this kind of work exudes in the context of the artists' own homes and yards, a quality that is often lost in sleeker, formalist presentations.
The evocation of this period in American youth culture is sound: Arlene and Sheila hook up with kids as apparently simple and carefree as themselves.
Even Les Sylphides, Fokine's evocation of Romantic ballet, has Duncan's perfume, albeit blended with the classical poetry of Pavlova, the muse for whom he created the ballerina role.
Lee shows that while the commentaries of eighteenth-century critics like Pope, Guthrie, and Johnson discuss external notions of "character," nineteenth-century critics, like Coleridge, often praise the evocation of Hamlet's inner self as the chief excellence of the play.
Even so, listeners will find lots to enjoy in this remarkable evocation of the life and times of a man born into a colonial system and educated at an elite public school who consciously reshaped his life and art and went on to produce the icons by which the 20th century resisted both class oppression and bureaucratic totalitarianism.
Furniture and fittings, such as the abstract evocation of an antique canopy over the bed, are similarly austere, and spaces flowing one into another are defined by strong, simple forms carefully modelled by light and shadow.
Guillem's evocation of bustling village life even includes some occasional pointless shouting from the villagers.
Peter's provides an immediate and powerful evocation of the majesty of the Roman Catholic Church and of the city where it is headquartered.