eviscerate


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eviscerate

(ĭ-vĭs′ə-rāt′)
v. eviscer·ated, eviscer·ating, eviscer·ates
v.tr.
1. To remove the entrails of; disembowel.
2. Medicine
a. To remove the contents of (an organ).
b. To remove an organ, such as an eye, from (a patient).
v.intr. Medicine
To protrude through a wound or surgical incision.

e·vis′cer·a′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
1989), the courts held that applying the omission-of-income test to cases involving the disallowance of deductions would eviscerate the innocent-spouse defense, because merely looking at the return informs the spouse of the transaction that gave rise to the deduction.
To some degree these chapters resonate back and forth as Skura analyzes the potential danger that players were thought to exhibit (players as "monsters and freaks") and, alternatively, a similar potential projected by the audience, which is always ready to mock, ridicule, and eviscerate.
The Enron debacle is still too fresh for anyone to know whether it, too, will galvanize government action or just go into history as a spectacular bankruptcy, in which greed, political connections, hubris and bad judgment came together to shatter lives and eviscerate retirement savings.
The Big Five have the weapon of a veto in the UN, because they possess enough nuclear missiles to eviscerate the world many times over.
Perdue hopes to eviscerate language in the Georgia Constitution that states, "No money shall ever be taken from the public treasury, directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, sect, cult, or religious denomination or of any sectarian institution.
equity markets, Cox seems intent upon introducing new technology throughout the marketplace that will eviscerate the number of people employed by the major exchanges and many vendors as well.
Essentially we are being asked to eviscerate the book," he said.
Telling a customer that he needs to eviscerate his infrastructure is a good way to lose a sale.
Like your nemesis in the movie "T2," who had the ability to reconstitute himself after he was split into two by a shotgun blast, mercurial lawmakers in Sacramento (and everywhere else) have been known to eviscerate well-intentioned reforms, just when the public thought they'd won the fight.
Under current law, reporters' ability to shield sources from the long arm of the law is not a federal right for all Americans but a privilege granted in 31 states and the District of Columbia to the limited category of human being known as "journalist" And by wearing the First Amendment like a badge, Bronstein is neatly evading his role in helping the government eviscerate another part of the Bill of Rights.
Evangelical Christians, as extreme in their beliefs as al-Qaida members are in theirs, pose a serious threat to this country's democratic traditions by attempting to eviscerate church-state separation, establish an official state religion and impose their myth-based beliefs on the rest of us.
Others worry that wartime jingoism threatens to eviscerate freedom of speech in the very place where it should be most hallowed.