event


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e·vent

(ē-vent'),
Specific occurrence, such as an episode of illness; often used in terminology of clinical trials.
[L. eventus, outcome, fr. e-, out, + venio, to come]

event

Medtalk
1. Error, see there.
2. Misadventure, see there. See Accelerated compensation event, Adverse event, Adverse drug event, Cardiac event, Life event, Mutually exclusive event, Qualifying event, Sentinel event, Signal event, Terminal event, Unusual life event Statistics One or more outcomes of a probability experiment.

e·vent

(ē-vent')
Specific occurrence, such as an episode of illness; often used in terminology of clinical trials.
[L. eventus, outcome, fr. e, out, + venio, to come]

event

1. an equine contest other than a race, e.g. a 3-day event.
2. in statistics the outcome of a random experiment.

event diary
pocket diary designed for farmer use to record all events necessary to complete farm records kept for health and production surveillance purposes.
event horse
a horse suitable for use in 3-day events and similar contests.

Patient discussion about event

Q. A tumor was discovered in my kidney how should I prepare myself to the future events?

A. sorry to hear...there are all sorts of tumors in kidneys but generally i recommend first of all talking to your family and explain the situation. but only after you understand what it is and what that means. you will need a lot of support and you don't want to leave your loved ones in the darkness about it. believe me that is the basic in preparing yourself to any tumor therapy.
good luck!!
you'll be fine i'm sure!!

Q. Too many weddings with too many fatty food – any advice? In the last few months I’ve been on a moderate diet, and already lost 10 pounds, but now I’m facing a threat – a series of weddings, all of them with lots of fatty food and cakes tempting me to “just taste them”… Any advice how to avoid these calorie-rich pitfalls? :-)

A. Try to pick the low-calorie food – a wedding doesn’t have to mean you must eat unhealthy food. For example drink water, eat salad etc.

More discussions about event
References in classic literature ?
We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand).
The clearest instance of what I mean is recollection of a past event.
That is to say, they believe that every psychical event has a psychical cause and a physical concomitant.
At all events, a little golden fragment of bachelorhood remained.
So, if we proceed with our narrative of the chair, I shall still confine myself to its connection with public events.
Of course the root of them was in the events which we have already recorded, and which so filled Vera with grief on the prince's account that she fell seriously ill.
Besides, the recent events that had befallen her family had given Adelaida much to think about, especially the sad experiences of her younger sister.
At all events, I've had a good Russian cry over this poor fellow," she added, pointing to the prince, who had not recognized her in the slightest degree.
He set himself to finish the tale of Troy, which, so far as events were concerned, had been left half-told by Homer, by tracing the course of events after the close of the "Iliad".
The "Cyprian Lays", ascribed to Stasinus of Cyprus (14) (but also to Hegesinus of Salamis) was designed to do for the events preceding the action of the "Iliad" what Arctinus had done for the later phases of the Trojan War.
If the machinery of the Law could be depended on to fathom every case of suspicion, and to conduct every process of inquiry, with moderate assistance only from the lubricating influences of oil of gold, the events which fill these pages might have claimed their share of the public attention in a Court of Justice.
Thus, the story here presented will be told by more than one pen, as the story of an offence against the laws is told in Court by more than one witness--with the same object, in both cases, to present the truth always in its most direct and most intelligible aspect; and to trace the course of one complete series of events, by making the persons who have been most closely connected with them, at each successive stage, relate their own experience, word for word.