euthymic

eu·thy·mic

(yū-thī'mik),
Relating to, or characterized by, euthymia.

euthymic

pertaining to a normal mood in which the range of emotions is neither depressed nor highly elevated.

eu·thy·mic

(yū-thī'mik)
Relating to, or characterized by, euthymia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Goldsmith, chief resident for the research track at Emory University's department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Atlanta, and his collaborators looked at 36 studies examining individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) (12 studies), euthymic bipolar disorder (14 studies), and chronic schizophrenia (10 studies).
9) found in 200' with 29 euthymic cases that 29 EEG PSD was higher than healthy controls in all bands.
The fact that women in this survey seemed relieved and objectively euthymic (as revealed by the completed PTSD and depression screening instruments), yet admitted to depressed mood/suicidal ideation/ conflicted emotions, emphasises the subjective experience of the TOP.
Mood and affect: range, type and appropriateness of affect (objectively euthymic, depressed, elevated)
With the objective of assessing seasonality and its contributing factors in patients with BD, we did a cross-sectional study involving 49 euthymic patients with BD diagnosed according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD)-10 criteria.
79) left DLPFC Euthymic at the end of treatment but with relapse 2 months later Tan et al.
Sleep related functioning in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder, patients with insomnia, and subjects without sleep problems.
The researcher must also consider whether the "behavioral state under investigation is static (developmental anomaly, old head injury), episodic (bipolar manic depressive versus euthymic state), or progressive (Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia).
Neuropsychological functioning in euthymic bipolar disorder: A metaanalysis.
Neuropsychological performance in depressed and euthymic bipolar patients.
Considering the growing appreciation of what appear to be real effects of exposure to medicine and to the disorder, what we need now are large, prospective studies that provide more reliable data, comparing euthymic women on antidepressants with women who are not depressed and who are not on an antidepressant - a study that has not been conducted to date.