euthermic

euthermic

 [u-ther´mik]
characterized by the proper temperatures; promoting warmth.

eu·ther·mic

(yū-ther'mik),
At an optimal temperature.
[eu- + G. thermos, warm]

euthermic

/eu·ther·mic/ (u-ther´mik) characterized by the proper temperature; promoting warmth.

eu·ther·mic

(yū-thĕr'mik)
At an optimal temperature.
[eu- + G. thermos, warm]

euthermic

characterized by the proper temperatures; promoting warmth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our data indicate that the main effects of hibernation on ageing processes are linked to euthermic episodes which are associated with the shortening of telomeres, an indicator of ageing," the researchers concluded.
During hibernation, mammals undergo repeated cycles of torpor and arousal and several physiological and biochemical parameters are reversed to normal euthermic levels
Pathology in euthermic bats with white nose syndrome suggests a natural manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.
On examination, the patient was euthermic with heart rate 110 beats per minute.
During hibernation, mammals undergo repeated cycles of torpor and arousal and several physiological and biochemical parameters are reversed to normal euthermic levels without obvious damages in a short period when they return to aroused state (Okamoto et al.
They also demonstrate that under field conditions, hibernation (the period of sequestration below ground) and the heterothermal period (the period between onset of first torpor and arousal from final torpor) are not necessarily equivalent; squirrels may spend several days euthermic but sequestered below ground before and especially after the heterothermal period (Michener, 1992; Barnes and Ritter, 1993).
During the warming phase of arousals, the heat generated (mainly by burning fat in brown adipose tissue and muscle shivering) causes the body temperature to rise from near ambient to euthermic levels (Smalley 1963, Hayward & Ball 1966).
Males accomplish this by caching seeds and fruits in the fall and eating these foods in the spring during a period in which they are euthermic but have not left their hibernacula (Buck and Barnes, 1999).
Temperature regulation and metabolism of an Australian bat, Chalinolobus gouldii (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidac) when euthermic and torpid.
We concluded that aardwolves have a much lower basal metabolic rate and evaporative water loss relative to other euthermic mammals, and that these factors together made significant contributions toward their capacity to endure periods of food deprivation, like those encountered during the wintertime, and toward their successful occupation of arid lands, which have low primary production and scant rainfall.