euphoria

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euphoria

 [u-for´e-ah]
an exaggerated feeling of physical and mental well-being, especially when not justified by external reality. Euphoria may be induced by drugs such as opioids, amphetamines, and alcohol and is also a feature of mania. adj., adj euphor´ic.

eu·pho·ri·a

(yū-fōr'ē-ă),
1. A feeling of well-being, commonly exaggerated and not necessarily well founded.
2. The pleasure state induced by a drug or substance of abuse.
[eu- + G. pherō, to bear]

euphoria

/eu·pho·ria/ (u-for´e-ah) an exaggerated feeling of physical and mental well-being, especially when not justified by external reality.euphor´ic

euphoria

[yo̅o̅fôr′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, eu + pherein, to bear
1 a feeling or state of well-being or elation.
2 an exaggerated or abnormal sense of physical and emotional well-being not based on reality or truth, disproportionate to its cause, and inappropriate to the situation, as commonly seen in the manic stage of bipolar disorder, some forms of schizophrenia, organic mental disorders, and toxic and drug-induced states. Compare ecstasy.

eu·pho·ri·a

(yū-fōr'ē-ă)
A feeling of well-being, commonly exaggerated and not necessarily well founded.
[eu- + G. pherō, to bear]

euphoria

A strong feeling of well-being or happiness. The term is sometimes used to mean an abnormally exaggerated feeling of elation.

Euphoria

An intense feeling of elation or well-being. Many marijuana users experience temporary euphoria.
Mentioned in: Marijuana

eu·pho·ri·a

(yū-fōr'ē-ă)
1. A feeling of well-being, not necessarily well founded.
2. The pleasure state induced by a drug or substance of abuse.
[eu- + G. pherō, to bear]

euphoria (ūfôr´ēə),

n a sense of well-being or normalcy. Pleasantly mild excitement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even so, Peter Raven, the president of Science's publisher, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), at that time euphorically endorsed the report, stating in the New York Times, "This is a just outcome that ought to bring [Lomborg's] credibility to a halt except for those who desperately want to believe what he says.
Though she had long called herself an "independent woman," during her travels she finally feels free of burdens, and she writes euphorically, "I felt like a sixteen-year-old who's just been given permission to drive the family car" (7).
According to many sources, after the fight, as African Americans euphorically rejoiced (because to them, Johnson's victory was proof that Black people were equal to white persons, if nowhere else, then at least in the ring), more than 26 of the rejoicers were killed by whites, and hundreds more were reported hurt in many places throughout the United States, but mostly in the South.
Euphorically cast strips of white bread into the sympathetic ocean:
The short story finds Jack and Ennis waking up and effortlessly knowing "how it would go for the rest of the summer"--as indeed it does, euphorically, their sex "quick, rough, laughing and snorting," whereas the movie finds Ennis returning to the high pasturage under lowering, thunder-racked skies, only to discover a bloody, eviscerated sheep--a guilt-inducing, sin-and-ye-shall-pay symbol worthy of the Old Testament but utterly absent in Proulx's text.
A proposed law to increase certain customs tariffs has been unanimously approved, euphorically.
After defeating the enemies of the Cloud Country, Count Mergen Khan and his heir Prince Tayyichiut head euphorically home.
The sight of those flags waving euphorically in the balmy breeze will live forever with everyone who was present.
But when a motorcycle hits a pot-hole, particularly at highway speeds, the paramedics do all the work, as you wait patiently in a relaxing coma, or peer down euphorically from the branches of a nearby tree.
Sky's roving cameramen scurry from table to table as the gathered masses grin euphorically into the lens, many proudly brandishing hastily-scrawled messages of support for one tungsten gladiator or other.
For the first time, she euphorically feels that she belongs somewhere, and, in her mind, in a great spirit of solidarity, she forms a gang for people like herself: the SCARZ.
New users discovered a drug that could make them feel euphorically happy for as long as six hours--hence its street name--and increase their sensitivity to touch, taste, and smell.