eugenics


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eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

[yo̅o̅jen′iks]
Etymology: Gk, eu + genein, to produce
the study of methods for controlling the characteristics of populations through selective breeding.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
This resulted in the arrival of a large number of newcomers, many of whom likely knew nothing of the existence of the eugenics program.
Helped by well-heeled benefactors such as the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Harriman railroad fortune, the eugenics movement was already roaring in the Roaring '20s.
Through this analysis, conclusions will be drawn about the relative strength of feminism and eugenics in the interwar period.
On May 15, 1935, Oklahoma passed a third and final eugenics statute--sponsored most zealously by Dr.
Another member of the National Academy of Sciences, Harvard-trained biologist Charles Davenport headed the Eugenics Record Office.
In one of the more recent studies Grekul, Krahn, and Odynak (2004) identify several subgroups, including women, Aboriginals, and teenagers and young adults that were overrepresented in cases sterilized by the Eugenics Board and its affiliated mental health institutions.
Widespread negative eugenics occurred in the twentieth century, under the direction of Marie Stopes (Britain), Margaret Sanger (America) and Adolf Hitler (Germany).
Paul said: "In the movie Gattaca, in the not-too-distant future, eugenics is common and DNA plays a primary role in determining your social class.
Angus Moon QC, representing the Official Solicitor, who was in court to protect DE's interests, told the judge that the evidence that DE wants a vasectomy is "compelling" and nothing to do with eugenics.
The eugenics movement, which presupposed the truth of the evolution of species, was later discredited after accumulating evidence indicated that heredity was too complicated to make eugenics very effective in practice.
London, July 13 ( ANI ): The falling cost of DNA testing means that Britain is on the verge of a new era of eugenics, a leading scientist has claimed.