eugenics


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eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

[yo̅o̅jen′iks]
Etymology: Gk, eu + genein, to produce
the study of methods for controlling the characteristics of populations through selective breeding.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
IN HIS BOOK ILLIBERAL REFORMERS Thomas Leonard shows not only that the most thoroughgoing social Darwinists were Progressives, but that eugenics lay at the very center of the Progressive program for the betterment of the human condition.
If we want to ensure that history does not repeat itself, then we need to recognize how people with disabilities experienced discrimination based on eugenic ideas of human worth and contemplate how such prejudices might manifest themselves in contemporary public policy and medical marketing.
13) At that time, Galton defined eugenics as "the science of improving stock .
In doing so, her study focuses on the period in American history when eugenics and sterilization have been presumed to be in their ascendency.
When eugenics fell out of favor after World War II, most references to eugenics were removed from textbooks and subsequent editions of relevant journals.
This section covers some well-trod ground for readers familiar with eugenics scholarship, notably Daniel Kevles' In the Name of Eugenics.
In the late nineteenth century, human breeding was being promoted by Francis Galton (1822-1911), a statistician who has been called "the father of the eugenics movement".
Angelico would have learned about the discourse of eugenics that Charles Darwin's nephew Francis Galton first described in his books Hereditary Genius (1869) and Human Faculty (1883) and in his articles published in Revista Europa in 1874 and 1876 (Cleminson 2000 81).
me/pibfvw0e) MSNBC host Rachel Maddow who compared bits of the Wikipedia entry to Rand Paul's discourse on abortion and eugenics.
Angus Moon QC, representing the Official Solicitor, who was in court to protect DE's interests, told the judge that the evidence that DE wants a vasectomy is "compelling" and nothing to do with eugenics.
The eugenics movement, which presupposed the truth of the evolution of species, was later discredited after accumulating evidence indicated that heredity was too complicated to make eugenics very effective in practice.
Would it lead to eugenics and a stratified society where only the rich enjoy the benefits of genetic enhancement?