etymology


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etymology

Etymology: Gk, etymos, base; L, logos, words
the study of the origin and development of words.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While no generally accepted previous examples of such a change are known, it does have an obvious parallel in the next etymology (4): PMari *lewa ~ *liwa'warm'< PU *lampi 'warm'.
Among dubious Germanic loan stems are two bigger groups: the ones with a possible Baltic and others with a possible Scandinavian etymology beside the Germanic one.
As others have made clear in previous issues, this is almost never true, to the extent that the first rule of etymology is never to believe an acronymic origin unless presented with incontrovertible evidence to the contrary.
Podium: Here's another case of ignoring obvious etymology, using podium in place of lectern.
Rinaldi also suggests that the etymology "homo-humus" found in Tertullian and Lactantius prefigures the final transformation of Momus, whose choleric nature he links both to Alberti's personal emblem of the lion and to the God of Lactantius's De ira Dei.
It is also strange that, although Giuseppe Messina is cited in the bibliography, Natella does not pay greater attention to the different interpretations that Messina gives to the history and etymology of the word mafia.
Teachers and students studying etymology at all levels will enjoy it.
In his introduction, Dickson-Carr states, "If the etymology of 'satire' begins with the Latin satura--a mix--then the satirical novel sits atop the generic mountain, mixing everything below it.
One crucial issue in the search for an American language rooted in nature was etymology and the origin of language itself, West illustrates the debate with examples of philologists who thought the first human words must have been interjections (Hugh Blair), or nouns (Horne Tooke), or verbs (Samuel Taylor Coleridge).
Little wonder members of the College of Cardinals are known as "princes of the church," even though the etymology of the word cardinal, from the Latin cardo, denotes a beam used to fortify a structure.
The lack of a Dutch etymology for taafda `knee' is unsurprising: the Nhanda word I recorded is tharda, which can be compared with Wajarri tharnda `heel', and Pintupi and Luritja tjarndarr-pa `knee, kneecap'.
We are stuck into molds devised by etymology, chronology, and geography and, thus, miss the point.