etymology


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etymology

Etymology: Gk, etymos, base; L, logos, words
the study of the origin and development of words.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
18) This etymology would, therefore, explain the variation between forms like alriche and elriche, and offers an eminently suitable meaning for the etymon of eldritch.
And the entry for gibberish in The Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology offers this explanation of the word's origin: 'About 1554 gibbrish (gibbr- imitative of the sound of chatter, probably influenced by jabber + -ish, after language names such as Finnish, Turkish, and English).
An etymology deriving the name Aurora from the noun ros would have had to back it up the familiar reality of dew covering the ground at dawn.
This etymology is already found in Poppe (1960: 61).
4) That will explain in part why the etymology of dyvour puzzled the editors of OED and, it seems, all other lexicographers.
A bacronymic etymology sometimes provides one of several common types of "etymythology.
What is the etymology of Yanomami ("Rumble in the jungle," SN: 1/27/01, p.
These include operating with a hypothetical "root", which reminds of some attempts in Finnish etymology in the late 19th century.
I feel that Wade was absolutely right to include so many controversies, emphasizing that etymology is rich in scholarly conjecture and debate.
295-6; 'A Brittonic Etymology for luche "throw" in Patience 230', SELIM, iii (1993), 150-3; 'Celtic Etymologies for Middle English brag "boast", gird "strike", and lethe "soften'", Journal of Celtic Linguistics, iii (1994), 135-48: 'A Celtic Etymology for glaverez "deceives" at Pearl 688', N&Q, ccxl (1995), 160-2.
Etymology and psychology, indeed, have much in common -- so much so that maybe we should think of language in the way we think of personality.
Dindshenchas or Dinnsheanchas("Lore of Places") Studies in Gaelic prose and verse of the etymology and history of place-names in Ireland--e.