etymology

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etymology

Etymology: Gk, etymos, base; L, logos, words
the study of the origin and development of words.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first modern edition of the Etymologies was published by W.
But there are also many spurious acronymic etymologies presented for new words.
The earliest date unrepresented in the etymologies is 1983.
The Russianist will find here the etymologies of a selection of common words (idti but not ekhat'), including well-known intriguing cases such as sorok, 'forty', derived from 'bag containing 40 sable or squirrel skins', and vokzal 'mainline station', ultimately from the pleasure-gardens at Vauxhall on the Thames (1661-1859).
71) Although I have made very little of Tooke's reliance on Anglo-Saxon for his etymologies, and his claims to the historical, and so "causal," priority of Anglo Saxon, this sense of an impending rediscovery of buried political truths is born out, on a more traditional level, in his Gothicism.
DOSAE stresses that "the etymologies remain unknown".
Maltby, A Lexicon of Ancient Latin Etymologies [Leeds, 1991], s.
In the fifth chapter the author relates Socrates' etymologies to the positions of Pherecydes, Heraclitus, Empedocles, the Homeric Interpreters, the Anaxagorean school, the Derveni Commentator, astronomers and cosmologists, tragedians and sophists.
On the walls Fabo inscribed in his calligraphic hand personal and dictionary etymologies of words like "erratic," a word that refers not only to a geological formation but also to the serendipity with which connections are formed.
The derivation of the term is unknown, all of the suggested etymologies being pure guesswork.
Among the 13 excerpts are Quintilian on the orator as philosopher, Isidor of Seville from the Etymologies, Ibn Rushd on the connection between religion and philosophy, Maimonides on God and creation, Francisco de Vitoria on whether war is ever just, Bartolome on human sacrifice and cannibalism, Francisco Suarez on power and the people, and Miguel de Unamuno's quixotic ethics.