etymology

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etymology

Etymology: Gk, etymos, base; L, logos, words
the study of the origin and development of words.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the sake of completeness it needs to be mentioned that several Khanty varieties use a functionally similar, yet etymologically unrelated verb (see Wagner-Nagy 2011 : 127).
Jin" is etymologically identical to the Lao term [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (ciin), the Thai term [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (jeen), the Sanskrit term [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (cina), the Persian term [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (cin), the Arabic term [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (sin), the Latin term Sinae, the French term Chine, the English/German/Spanish/Portuguese term China, etc.
Unfortunately, they provide no statistics that could show the consistency of the scribe in marking etymologically geminate (long) consonants with <CC> digraphs.
Etymologically, all are related to the Hebrew root dsn.
I believe in the possibility of integral connections between communal worship and personal endeavor outside the liturgical experience not least because the word liturgy etymologically and historically implies such a movement or relationship.
There is actually some confusion as to the origin of the Eccles cake; some say it's actually from that suburb of Manchester and some maintain it's etymologically derived from the definition 'egg-less cake'.
It exists only to captivate the boy whose name is etymologically related to "narcotic.
The text etymologically analyzed non-Arabic words found in the Qur'an that are borrowed from some 56 other languages, including Sumerian, Hebrew, Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Mandaean, Nabataean, Ethiopic, Egyptian, Sanskrit, Persian, Greek, and Armenian (to name some of the most common languages represented), thus providing a research aid for those wishing to understand the outside influences on Islam and the formation of the Qur'an.
Etymologically the term "terror" comes from the Latin terror (3).
This term is certainly etymologically correct, but persistent and unnecessary use of this current buzz-word of French anthropology grates; in decades of reading texts on French prehistory I have rarely encountered it (and indeed it is almost absent from the second, more archaeological volume that concerns us here).
Throughout the book, I especially admired its author's alertness to Milton's etymologically charged and densely enmeshed language--the interwoven vocabulary of hope (spero) and breath (spiro), for example.
They are "unruly," meaning etymologically that they cannot be ruled.