etymology

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etymology

Etymology: Gk, etymos, base; L, logos, words
the study of the origin and development of words.

etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: Impressively well written, organized and presented, "A Historical and Etymological Dictionary of American Sign Language" is a seminal work of exceptional scholarship.
The etymological analysis of the 150 terms yielded the following results:
Proto-Sino-Tibetan cannot be compared because it is a hypothetical notion without a sufficient amount of etymological items representing a sufficient number of languages.
While Puhvel's etymological dictionary does not have the same descriptivist goals as the CHD, it would be desirable to see it take some cues on presentation from its competitors.
She finds poetry in accidents of history, in the cultural lapsus that an etymological tree reveals.
lass), which gives support to the present etymological proposal.
bird--words with the analysis of the lexical category hen which stands both for the name of the female and of the race, though the etymological sources that have been consulted register the presence of the lexical unit cock a century earlier in the English language than the appearance of the word hen.
These senses all make sense once you institute a bit of etymological digging: A Latin ancestor of institution meant custom; instruction; element of instruction; appointment of an heir.
The term "bespoke" is applied to many things these days, from chocolate to a child's education, but its etymological and spiritual root still lies in the myriad men's shops of Central London's Savile Row, where buying clothes is as big a commitment as holy matrimony.
This list is replete with etymological research and explanation, phonetic and phonological variations, and the religious function of each palero deity.
Etwas zu kurz kommt bei Ringdal, dass GM nicht nur durch Sprachbeschreibungen, sondem ebenso auch--er hatte ja Indogermanische Sprachwissenschaft studiert--durch sprachhistorisch orientierte Werke hervorgetreten ist: An Etymological Vocabulary of Pashto (Oslo 1927) (13) und Etymological Vocabulary of the Shughni Group (Wiesbaden 1974).
Etymological dictionaries can be such a joy to browse through and to use, if they merit the reader's respect.