etiotropic

e·ti·o·tro·pic

(ē'tē-ō-trop'ik),
Directed against the cause; denoting a remedy that attenuates or destroys the causal factor of a disease.
[G. aitia, cause, + tropē, a turning]

etiotropic

(ē″tē-ō-trŏp′ĭk) [Gr. aita, cause, + tropos, turning]
Directed against the cause of a disease; used of a drug or treatment that destroys or inactivates the causal agent of a disease. Opposite of nosotropic.

e·ti·o·tro·pic

(ētē-ō-trōpik)
Directed against the cause; denoting a remedy that attenuates or destroys the causal factor of a disease.
[G. aitia, cause, + tropē, a turning]
References in periodicals archive ?
Under such circumstances, the systemic etiotropic antibacterial therapy (SEAT) in these patients doomed to failure in the case of ignoring changes in the structure of microflora and its resistance to antibiotics.
2005; 2006), we speculated that the etiotropic effects of DFA III could be applied to group-housed calves that are fed milk replacers and that DFA III administration would help maintain good health in the calves and hence reduce the use of antibiotics.
Design and study of new agents having antitubercular activity: the original compound perchlosone as a potent agent of etiotropic therapy for tuberculosis.
Furthermore, a number of studies have shown it has beneficial effects in animals such as etiotropic effects on the health status and growth rates of calves (Matsumoto et al.