ethologist


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ethologist

 [ĕ-thol´o-jist]
a person skilled in ethology.

e·thol·o·gist

(ē-thol'ŏ-jist),
A specialist in ethology.

ethologist

a person skilled in ethology.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sociobiology is a set of evolutionary theories developed by ethologists to explain social behaviour.
Erikson's suggestion is that Satyagraha is a ritual of pacification which "may derive some of its obvious strength from an evolutionary potential" that is illustrated in the rituals among animals that the ethologists record.
There came to be the need for a school for children from four to seven years old, which was run by the enthusiastic parents, with an ethologist teacher, Elizabeth Neave.
The section on breeding animals in zoos is a masterly short review of the skill and sheer genius that zoo nutritionists, veterinarians, ethologists, curators, and keepers have applied to enhance the health and husbandry of animals in their care.
13,47,50) The ethologist interested in attachment might have a different view, but how does the clinician appreciate the differences and decide which approach is appropriate?
One talks about how charming, articulate, and wise Bronowski is, or how thrilling was the slow-motion seque nce of the infant pulling himself triumphantly to a full stand, or how human the chimpanzees seem in their relations with the ethologist, or how difficult it must be to spend ten years in the African bush with no one but a great ape for a friend.
It is that quality, said ethologist Jane Goodall--not toolmaking or feeling for another person--that separates us from other primates.
Roberts, industry experts Jean Donaldson, founder and director of The Academy for Dog Trainers; Malena DeMartini-Price, author of "Treating Separation Anxiety in Dogs" and ethologist and behaviorist Jennifer Cattet, Ph.
But from the perspective of the cognitive ethologist, all cognition is genetically predisposed, so the differences are largely a matter of degree, not kind.
Monkey mothers lower their heads and then move them up and down while looking at babies seated nearby as a prelude to mutual eye contact and lip smacking, ethologist Pier Ferrari of the University of Parma in Italy and colleagues report online October 8 in Current Biology.
The controversial ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer has a bestseller to his name, as the author of The Selfish Gene, which popularises the gene-centred view of evolution.