ethologist


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ethologist

 [ĕ-thol´o-jist]
a person skilled in ethology.

e·thol·o·gist

(ē-thol'ŏ-jist),
A specialist in ethology.

ethologist

a person skilled in ethology.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is a term used by ethologists (people who study animal behavior in the natural setting) to describe an internal physiological/neurological condition that alters an animal's readiness to respond and variation in the intensity/duration of that response.
Ethologists can devote entire careers to untangling aspects of behaviour without thinking much about evolution.
Marc Bekoff, a well known ethologist, analyzed videotapes of play behavior among dogs frame-by-frame.
Esther was trained as ethologist and started her career by carefully documenting repetitive movement stereotypy's, first in grooming wasps (masters degree, 1973) and, later in developing infants (doctoral degree, 1977).
Lay, animal scientists Jeremy Marchant-Forde and Ruth Marchant-Forde, animal immunologist Susan Eicher, and neuroscientist Heng-wei Cheng, all with ARS's Livestock Behavior Research Unit, and ethologist Ed Pajor, with Purdue University at West Lafayette, Indiana.
I wanted to follow in Jane Goodall's footsteps and be a research ethologist.
He finds resources in the thought of Freud and also in the research of the ethologist Konrad Lorenz.
Yet, each profession, from engineer to veterinarian to ethologist, often has a unique definition of "good" management.
Jordi Sabater Pi, ethologist and scientific illustrator
A famous ethologist reported to me that when he conducted long-term field studies of mule deer behavior, some of the deer became so used to (and one may speculate, contemptuous of) his presence that he kept his spotting-scope tripod handy in case he needed to fend off a charging buck.
The German ethologist Irenaus Eibl-Eibesfeldt has described what childhood is like in the hunter-gatherer and tribal societies he spent many years observing.
Lishman adapted techniques that Austrian ethologist Konrad Lorenz pioneered with greylag geese in the 1930s: He conditioned the goslings to the sounds of his voice and the aircraft's engine while they were hatching and trained them to run and eventually fly behind his 250- pound plane.