ethology

(redirected from ethologically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ethology

 [ĕ-thol´o-je]
the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state. adj., adj etholog´ical.

e·thol·o·gy

(ē-thol'ŏ-jē),
The study of animal behavior.
[G. ethos, character, habit, + logos, study]

ethology

/eth·ol·o·gy/ (e-thol´ah-je) the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state.etholog´ical

ethology

(ĭ-thŏl′ə-jē, ē-thŏl′-)
n.
1. The scientific study of animal behavior, especially as it occurs in a natural environment.
2. The study of human ethos and its formation.

eth′o·log′i·cal (ĕth′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
e·thol′o·gist n.

ethology

[ethol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, ethos, character, logos, science
1 (in zoology) the scientific study of the behavioral patterns of animals, specifically in their native habitat.
2 (in psychology) the empiric study of human behavior, primarily social customs, manners, and mores. ethologic, ethological, adj., ethologist, n.

ethology

the study of animal behaviour in the natural habitat of the animals concerned.

ethology

the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state.
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings support the concept of "biological preparedness" concerning the ease with which ethologically related stimuli can be associated (i.
Ethologically, this manifests in highly developed raiding skills.
Many animal models of anxiety examine the natural behavioral patterns of mice and rats to develop ethologically based behavioral tasks.
Also, unlike in the ethologically studied fixed action patterns, the relationship between environmental input that triggers grammatical output is arbitrary (Palmer).
Accordingly, at the ichnogeneric level, it is best assigned to Palaeophycus, most commonly interpreted ethologically as a dwelling structure (domichnion), produced infaunally, and subsequently passively infilled (Pemberton and Frey 1982; Keighley and Pickerill 1995).
For his part, Sidman argues that the stimuli and functions examined have not been ethologically relevant and that to map the standard features of conditional discrimination training onto nonhumans may be problematic.
shock, cold-water swim), relatively few studies have examined the consequences of exposing animals to ethologically relevant types of stressors.