ethology

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ethology

 [ĕ-thol´o-je]
the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state. adj., adj etholog´ical.

e·thol·o·gy

(ē-thol'ŏ-jē),
The study of animal behavior.
[G. ethos, character, habit, + logos, study]

ethology

/eth·ol·o·gy/ (e-thol´ah-je) the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state.etholog´ical

ethology

(ĭ-thŏl′ə-jē, ē-thŏl′-)
n.
1. The scientific study of animal behavior, especially as it occurs in a natural environment.
2. The study of human ethos and its formation.

eth′o·log′i·cal (ĕth′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
e·thol′o·gist n.

ethology

[ethol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, ethos, character, logos, science
1 (in zoology) the scientific study of the behavioral patterns of animals, specifically in their native habitat.
2 (in psychology) the empiric study of human behavior, primarily social customs, manners, and mores. ethologic, ethological, adj., ethologist, n.

ethology

the study of animal behaviour in the natural habitat of the animals concerned.

ethology

the scientific study of animal behavior, particularly in the natural state.
References in periodicals archive ?
These observations extend beyond the individual to include the social group and are the nuts and bolts of ethological "field studies.
The possibility of linking psychological to ethological theory also arises here.
Reid's most general defense of realism against impressionism is pragmatic and ethological.
Defending solicitor Bob Carr said: "I don't know what the psychological and ethological needs of these cows are and neither does Mr Norcliffe.
Ethograms are important starting points for ethological research and for understanding the biology and ecology of a wide range of animals (Lehner 1996).
The standard ethological test for self-awareness, the ability to recognize one's self in a mirror, has been given to animals of numerous species.
Palaeontological research has confirmed Darwin's view of Africa as the Cradle of Humankind, but ethological research on extant apes, and palaeoanthropological work on Plio-Pleistocene hominids, have raised a host of questions about the way in which a diversity of primates, extinct and extant, should be classified and assessed.
As part of a general shift towards a more ethological or ecologically valid perspective, there has been a renewed interest in how rodents respond to natural stressors.
We studied ethological and physiological features of male and female behavior at different stages of breeding, such as the onset of the rutting period, characteristics of forming, and subsequent disintegration of breeding pairs, the entire pattern of the breeding ritual up to copulation, ontogenesis of breeding ritual elements, characteristics of male interactions at various ages and dominance, the circumstances of the beginning, and entire pattern of tournament battles.
Ethological stressors may include the sight or odor of predators, confrontation with unflmiliar members of the same species, or fear cues.
As a working ethological psychologist whose research runs toward the behavioral development of iguanas, bears, and snakes (to whom I feed worms, fish, and mice), I am not a disinterested bystander to the debates on psychological and behavioral processes in animals or the methods used to study them.
Ethological and acoustical characters of the Chinese Grouse (Bonasa sewerzowi), compared with sibling Hazel Grouse (B.