ethnopharmacology


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eth·no·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(eth'nō-farm'ă-kol'ŏ-jē),
The study of differences in response to drugs based on varied ethnicity; pharmacogenetics.

ethnopharmacology

/eth·no·phar·ma·col·o·gy/ (-fahr″mah-kol´ah-je) the systematic study of the use of medicinal plants by specific cultural groups.

eth·no·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(eth'nō-fahrm'ă-kol'ŏ-jē)
The study of differences in response to drugs based on varied ethnicity; pharmacogenetics.

ethnopharmacology,

n study of the medicinal use of plants by different cultures.

eth·no·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(eth'nō-fahrm'ă-kol'ŏ-jē)
Study of differences in response to drugs based on varied ethnicity; also called pharmacogenetics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sung, Tanshinone IIA isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE induced apoptosis in HL60 human premyelocytic leukemia cell line, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 68, 121 (1999).
Antibacterial Activity of the Roots, Stems and Leaves of Alchornea floribunda, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 151: 1023-1027, 2014.
Jargin, "Hormesis and homeopathy: the artificial twins," Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, vol.
Lin, "Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Cuscuta chinensis against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats," Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol.
A study published in the January 2012 Journal of Ethnopharmacology found that the extract decreased levels of blood glucose and cholesterol in rats.
Ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacology: a successful combination in the study of Croton cajucara.
The first eight chapters introduce phytochemistry, ethnopharmacology and basic concepts and processes of herbal-pharmacology, including reverse pharmacology and research designs, both modern and Ayurvedic.
She plans to pursue a career in ethnopharmacology or environmental engineering.
y otros siete autores; Antineoplasic activity of Copaifera multijuga oil and fractions against ascitic and solid Ehrlich tumor, Journal of Ethnopharmacology.
Physician pharmacognosist Lansky and ethnopharmacology historian Paavilainen describe the chemistry and medicinal uses of various parts of selected species of figs, which they speculate may have been the first plant domesticated by humans--even before grains.