ethnonursing

ethnonursing

 [eth″no-ners´ing]
a research method for describing, documenting, and explaining nursing care phenomena by the study of the beliefs, values, and practices concerning nursing care that belong to a specific culture, as reflected by the language, beliefs, and values of the members of that culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overview of the theory of culture care with the ethnonursing research method.
Culture care diversity and universality theory and ethnonursing research method (3rd ed.
2008 Ethnonursing 9 key and 19 general informants who are AA ADN students.
Although we have made great advances in the development of ethnonursing research methods and transcultural nursing theories and concepts, Barbee and Gibson (2001) have articulated that:
For this reason, ethnonursing or trans-cultural nursing urges nurses to <<become culturally trained>>; a concept that must be understood as the possibility of acquiring knowledge on the multicultural reality and, particularly in the cultures in which the individual subject under their care is immersed, to thus be able to provide useful care that is respectful of the multicultural reality.
The experience of Mexican-Americans receiving professional nursing care: An ethnonursing study.
The second edition includes updates about Leininger's theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality and recent developments with the ethnonursing research methods.
An ethnonursing study of the influence of extended caregiving on the health status of elderly anglo-canadian wives caring for physically disabled husbands.
An ethnonursing study of Muscogee (Creek) Indians and effective health care practices for treating alcohol abuse.
Unlike any other method that has been applied in nursing practice, such as the ethnonursing methodology or existential phenomenology, this new method is not based on any other previous method, nor does it draw inspiration from any other method or research tradition.