ethnomedicine


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ethnomedicine

/eth·no·med·i·cine/ (eth″no-med´ĭ-sin) medical systems based on the cultural beliefs and practices of specific ethnic groups.ethnomed´ical

ethnomedicine

Any of a number of traditional, often aboriginal, medical systems that use native plants and herbs, which may be administered by a medicine man, witch doctor, curandero or shaman. Ethnomedical practitioners generally receive their education through a long apprenticeship, and may administer the therapy in a ritual and evoke the help of a deity. Ethnic medical practice is waning in cultures influenced or colonised by Western civilisation.

ethnomedicine (ethˈ·nō·meˑ·di·sin),

n the comparative study of native or indigenous systems of medicine. The topics of this study generally include etiology of disease, practitioners and their role in health care, and types of treatment administered.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of several factors including expansion of modern medicine and globalisation, a huge part of ethnomedicine is gradually disappearing.
This book combines an ethnomedicine perspective with the tools now available for scientific analysis to present an integrated consideration of the beneficial properties of honey.
Uterine contractility of plants used to facilitate childbirth in Nigerian ethnomedicine.
Badola, "Ethnomedicinal plant use by Lepcha tribe of Dzongu valley, bordering Khangchendzonga Biosphere Reserve, in North Sikkim, India," Journal ofEthnobiology and Ethnomedicine, vol.
Food Taboos: Their Origins and Purposes," a 2009 article in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine by Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow, notes that most human cultures avoid harvestable or easily slaughtered edible items all the time.
While food taboos may seem irrational to some, Dr Meyer-Rochow, whose research was published in the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, says they have performed a number of important functions.
The American team members are based at the Institute for Ethnomedicine in Jackson Hole, and serve as adjunct faculty at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah.
Once Cox realized that BMAA may be involved in multiple neurodegenerative diseases, he left Hawaii to establish the Institute for EthnoMedicine in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where he was joined by Banack and later by James Metcalf, a cyanobacterial expert.
This point of view shows how the commercialization of traditional knowledge and ethnomedicine made by local communities could become a form of commodification which deprives these traditional practices from their cultural and therapeutic values reducing them to mere "merchandise".
A potent sperm motility-inhibiting activity of bioflavonoids from an ethnomedicine of Onge, Alstonia macrophylla Wall ex A.
This led to an evolution of Jamaican Maroon ethnomedicine that has maintained aspects of West African Akan culture - such as plant species selection and their traditional use of this flora, including medicine preparation technologies.